Mystic Stamp Company
Shopping Cart:
Now in your cart 0 items
US STAMPS Online U.S. Stamp Catalog Stamp Albums and Supplies Worldwide Stamps Fleetwood & First Day Covers Selling Your Stamps? Help and Resources Receive Email Newsletter Contact Us

Click this Ad for more Information

next

1996 32c Computer Technology - Catalog # 3106

next
Condition:Price:
Mint Stamp(s)
Arrives in 7 to 10 days.
$1.30
Used Stamp(s)
Arrives in 7 to 10 days.
$0.15

 

Condition:Price:
Mint Plate Block of 4
Arrives in 7 to 10 days.
$6.50
Mystic First Day Cover
Arrives in 7 to 10 days.
$2.95
Mint Sheet of 40
Arrives in 7 to 10 days.
$50.00
Classic First Day Cover
Arrives in 7 to 10 days.
$2.25
Fleetwood First Day Cover
Arrives in 7 to 10 days.
$3.20
Fleetwood First Day Cover (plate block)
Arrives in 7 to 10 days.
$3.75

Grading Guide
Related Products:
15 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 38 x 46 millimeters (1-1/2 x 1-13/16 inches)
15 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 46 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-13/16 inches)

U.S. #3106
32¢ Computer Technology
 
Issue Date: October 8, 1996
City: Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD
Quantity: 93,512,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
10.9 x11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
Since ancient times people have used calculating devices, but it wasn’t until 1946 that the first general-purpose digital computer was developed.
 
With the onset of World War II, the ballistic research laboratory at Aberdeen Proving Ground was in need of a more advanced way to prepare firing and bombing tables for the Army and Army Air Corps. Until that time, these calculations had been carried out on a continuous variable calculator, which was not only extremely slow, but also subject to frequent breakdowns.
 
In an effort to improve the efficiency of their equipment, the staff at Aberdeen began working closely with the University of Pennsylvania’s Moore School of Electrical Engineering. Through this coordinated effort a plan was also formulated to produce the world’s first “true” computer. Using this plan, two engineers from the Moore School went on to develop ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer). Completed in 1946, it weighed more than 30 tons, and occupied more than 1500 square feet.
 
Used to calculate firing tables, as well as conduct top-secret research in the development of the hydrogen bomb, ENIAC ushered the world into the computer age and paved the way for smaller, more powerful computers.



(Click Image to Enlarge)