#3096 – 1996 32c Big Band Leaders: Count Basie

Mystic produced First Day Covers from 1992 to 2007. In 2007, Mystic bought Fleetwood and combined the two brands, continuing to produce Fleetwood covers. Fleetwood is the leading First Day Cover producer, making covers continuously since 1941. Fleetwood is the only FDC company that makes a cover for every U.S. postage stamp issued.
 
U.S. #3096
32¢ Count Basie
Big Band Leaders
 
Issue Date: September 11, 1996
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 23,025,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 x11.1
Color: Multicolored
 

Happy Birthday, Count Basie!

William James “Count” Basie was born on August 21, 1904, in Red Bank, New Jersey. 

Basie’s mother taught him to play piano when he was young and he began performing in his hometown as a young teenager.  He learned to accompany the silent films that played at the local theatre.  Basie preferred drums at first, but by the time he was 15 he realized his true talent was on the piano.

By the time Basie was in his early 20s, he was touring with vaudeville acts and traveled to the jazz centers in Kansas City, St. Louis, and Chicago.  In 1928, he got his first taste of the big band sound and joined a Kansas City band under the direction of Bennie Moten the next year.

The band, with Basie’s musical contributions, began playing a style of music that soon became known as swing.  After playing with Moten’s band for a number of years, Basie formed his own.  One night they were broadcasting on a local radio station and had some time to fill at the end of the program.  The group began improvising, and that session produced a song Basie called “One O’Clock Jump.”  It became the band’s signature songs for many years.

In 1936, Basie got the nickname “Count” from a radio announcer in Kansas City.  At the time, he went by Bill Basie, and the announcer said that was too ordinary of name.  Citing names like Earl Hines and Duke Ellington, the announcer said he’d call Basie “Count,” and the name stuck.

By 1936, his band was called Count Basie and His Barons of Rhythm.  They became known for their strong rhythm section and for using two tenor saxophones instead of just one.  Other bands were soon copying the sound.  That October, the band recorded some of their music.  The producer later called it “the only perfect, completely perfect recording session I’ve ever had anything to do with.”

Basie’s band continued until after World War II, when it seemed big band music had gone out of style.  After disbanding his large group, he began touring with smaller bands.  In the late 1950s, the Count made his first tour of Europe.  Jazz was popular there, and his music was well received.  He even played for Queen Elizabeth II.

Count Basie was able to continue playing his piano and leading bands for decades.  He played for such great soloists as Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, and Tony Bennett.  During his career the Count earned nine Grammy awards and made a permanent mark on American music.  He passed away on April 26, 1984, in Hollywood, Florida.  The Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank is one of several places named in his honor.

Click here for video of Basie and his band performing a number of songs.

Click here for more music stamps.

Read More - Click Here


  • Mini Mix, approximately 500 Stamps Mini Mix, 500 Worldwide Stamps

    Get an instant stamp collection in one simple step.  Order Mystic's mini-mix and you'll get 500-plus U.S. and foreign stamps on and off paper.

    $19.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1887-98  Reg Issues, 12 stamps, used 1887-98 Regular Issue, 12 Used Stamps
    Save time and effort with this collector's set of 12 postally used definitive stamps issued from 1887-1898.  These stamps are now all over 100 years old and represent a ton of neat history.  Order today!
    $30.95
    BUY NOW
  • German Zeppelin Facsimiles, 8v Mint German Zeppelin Facsimiles
    The original set of these overprinted German Graf Zeppelin stamps is very valuable. These high-quality facsimiles offered here were created in Germany and will allow you to affordably fill the spaces for these stamps in your worldwide album and enjoy their classic designs.
    $9.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #3096
32¢ Count Basie
Big Band Leaders
 
Issue Date: September 11, 1996
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 23,025,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 x11.1
Color: Multicolored
 

Happy Birthday, Count Basie!

William James “Count” Basie was born on August 21, 1904, in Red Bank, New Jersey. 

Basie’s mother taught him to play piano when he was young and he began performing in his hometown as a young teenager.  He learned to accompany the silent films that played at the local theatre.  Basie preferred drums at first, but by the time he was 15 he realized his true talent was on the piano.

By the time Basie was in his early 20s, he was touring with vaudeville acts and traveled to the jazz centers in Kansas City, St. Louis, and Chicago.  In 1928, he got his first taste of the big band sound and joined a Kansas City band under the direction of Bennie Moten the next year.

The band, with Basie’s musical contributions, began playing a style of music that soon became known as swing.  After playing with Moten’s band for a number of years, Basie formed his own.  One night they were broadcasting on a local radio station and had some time to fill at the end of the program.  The group began improvising, and that session produced a song Basie called “One O’Clock Jump.”  It became the band’s signature songs for many years.

In 1936, Basie got the nickname “Count” from a radio announcer in Kansas City.  At the time, he went by Bill Basie, and the announcer said that was too ordinary of name.  Citing names like Earl Hines and Duke Ellington, the announcer said he’d call Basie “Count,” and the name stuck.

By 1936, his band was called Count Basie and His Barons of Rhythm.  They became known for their strong rhythm section and for using two tenor saxophones instead of just one.  Other bands were soon copying the sound.  That October, the band recorded some of their music.  The producer later called it “the only perfect, completely perfect recording session I’ve ever had anything to do with.”

Basie’s band continued until after World War II, when it seemed big band music had gone out of style.  After disbanding his large group, he began touring with smaller bands.  In the late 1950s, the Count made his first tour of Europe.  Jazz was popular there, and his music was well received.  He even played for Queen Elizabeth II.

Count Basie was able to continue playing his piano and leading bands for decades.  He played for such great soloists as Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, and Tony Bennett.  During his career the Count earned nine Grammy awards and made a permanent mark on American music.  He passed away on April 26, 1984, in Hollywood, Florida.  The Count Basie Theatre in Red Bank is one of several places named in his honor.

Click here for video of Basie and his band performing a number of songs.

Click here for more music stamps.