#1022 – 1953 3¢ American Bar Association

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U.S. #1022
3¢ American Bar Association

Issue Date: August 24, 1953
City: Boston, MA
Quantity: 114,865,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10½
Color: Rose violet
 
U.S. #1022 commemorates the 75th anniversary of the American Bar Association. The stamp pictures a section of the frieze from the walls of the U.S. Supreme Court Room. It pictures four figures representing Wisdom, Justice, Divine Inspiration, and Truth. 
 
American Bar Association

Lawyers played an important role in forming the United States. Many delegates to the Constitutional Convention were attorneys, and quite a few of our early Presidents practiced law. Until the late 1800s, a person who had been an apprentice to a lawyer could train to become one himself. In Indiana, the constitution stated any citizen and voter of good character could begin a law practice.

After the Civil War, industry was expanding in the North and the demand for lawyers to represent corporations also increased. In 1870, a bar association was established in New York City to serve corporate attorneys. Many state associations were soon formed, as well.

On August 21, 1878, Connecticut lawyer Simeon Baldwin invited 100 men from his profession to meet in Saratoga Springs, New York, to organize a national group. The American Bar Association (ABA) was formed. Its constitution stated five goals, “to advance jurisprudence (the science of law), to encourage uniform state laws, to strengthen the administration of justice, to uphold the legal profession’s honor, and to encourage friendly interaction among bar members.”

The ABA has proposed state and federal laws since it’s founding, and pushed for a separate federal court to handle appeal cases. Around 1900, several states adopted laws that were suggested by the association. The federal this group proposed Bankruptcy Act. Congress created the US Circuit Court of Appeals after the ABA worked to get it for ten years.

The American Bar Association is a voluntary, nongovernmental association of American lawyers and judges. Its mission is to serve as a national representative of the legal profession, promote justice, professional excellence, and respect for the law. It also helps ensure that all people have access to legal services, and encourages improvements in the legal profession as well as in the administration of justice.

Today the American Bar Association  is headquartered in Chicago, Illinois and has over 400,000 members.  It also accredits US law schools.

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U.S. #1022
3¢ American Bar Association

Issue Date: August 24, 1953
City: Boston, MA
Quantity: 114,865,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10½
Color: Rose violet
 
U.S. #1022 commemorates the 75th anniversary of the American Bar Association. The stamp pictures a section of the frieze from the walls of the U.S. Supreme Court Room. It pictures four figures representing Wisdom, Justice, Divine Inspiration, and Truth. 
 
American Bar Association

Lawyers played an important role in forming the United States. Many delegates to the Constitutional Convention were attorneys, and quite a few of our early Presidents practiced law. Until the late 1800s, a person who had been an apprentice to a lawyer could train to become one himself. In Indiana, the constitution stated any citizen and voter of good character could begin a law practice.

After the Civil War, industry was expanding in the North and the demand for lawyers to represent corporations also increased. In 1870, a bar association was established in New York City to serve corporate attorneys. Many state associations were soon formed, as well.

On August 21, 1878, Connecticut lawyer Simeon Baldwin invited 100 men from his profession to meet in Saratoga Springs, New York, to organize a national group. The American Bar Association (ABA) was formed. Its constitution stated five goals, “to advance jurisprudence (the science of law), to encourage uniform state laws, to strengthen the administration of justice, to uphold the legal profession’s honor, and to encourage friendly interaction among bar members.”

The ABA has proposed state and federal laws since it’s founding, and pushed for a separate federal court to handle appeal cases. Around 1900, several states adopted laws that were suggested by the association. The federal this group proposed Bankruptcy Act. Congress created the US Circuit Court of Appeals after the ABA worked to get it for ten years.

The American Bar Association is a voluntary, nongovernmental association of American lawyers and judges. Its mission is to serve as a national representative of the legal profession, promote justice, professional excellence, and respect for the law. It also helps ensure that all people have access to legal services, and encourages improvements in the legal profession as well as in the administration of justice.

Today the American Bar Association  is headquartered in Chicago, Illinois and has over 400,000 members.  It also accredits US law schools.