#1025 – 1953 3¢ Trucking Industry

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.40
$0.40
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50145x30mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1025
3¢ Trucking Industry

Issue Date: October 27, 1953
City: Los Angeles, CA
Quantity: 123,709,600
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10½
Color: Violet
 
U.S. #1025 commemorates the first years of the trucking industry. The stamp pictures a 1950s-era truck with farm and city scenes in the background, representing the way trucking delivers goods between both settings.
 
Early Days of the Trucking Industry
Prior to 1900, most freight was carried by trains, which could move large amounts of products, but only to urban areas where the items were then transported by horse-drawn wagons. The earliest trucks were often more popular for their advertising space than carrying freight. A lack of paved roads in rural areas, small engines and limited capacities made trucks less desirable.
 
By 1910, the gasoline-powered internal combustion engine, improved transmissions, introduction of gear drives, and tractor and semi-trailers helped to greatly improve the popularity of trucking across the country. Within four years, almost 100,000 trucks were hitting the roads of America. The trucking industry still had its problems, as road conditions were still poor and the maximum speed limit in many areas was only 15 miles per hour.
 
During World War I, railroads became overloaded helping the war effort, and the need for an improved trucking industry became apparent. It was at this time that Roy Chapin experimented with the first long-distance truck shipments and inflated tires able to carry heavier loads, allowing trucks to drive at higher speeds. By 1920, more than one million trucks traveled America’s roads. 
 
The trucking industry continued to flourish with the introduction of the diesel engine, improved roads, standardized truck and trailer sizes, fifth wheel coupling systems, and power brakes and steering. 
 
 
Read More - Click Here


  • Latvia Map Stamps - Imperforate block of 16 with map on reverse, one imperforate single plus FREE album page and mounts Latvia Map Stamps

    Own rare World War I stamp artifacts most collectors have never even seen.  The first stamps of Latvia – printed on German military maps over 100 years ago. Order yours today!

    $36.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Baseball, Artcraft First Day Portraits, Set of 5 Legends of Baseball First Day Cover Set
    This set includes five special-edition First Day Covers featuring the 2000 Legends of Baseball US stamps. Each cover was canceled on the stamps' first day of issue and includes a large vintage photograph of the baseball player pictured on the stamp. Order yours today!
    $29.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Hollywood Full Pane Cover Mix - selections may vary Legends of Hollywood Full Pan Cover Mix
    These panes are really neat – they feature additional images of each star plus a brief biography.  These full pane covers were produced in small numbers. Selections vary – let us choose five covers to add to your collection today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1025
3¢ Trucking Industry

Issue Date: October 27, 1953
City: Los Angeles, CA
Quantity: 123,709,600
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10½
Color: Violet
 
U.S. #1025 commemorates the first years of the trucking industry. The stamp pictures a 1950s-era truck with farm and city scenes in the background, representing the way trucking delivers goods between both settings.
 
Early Days of the Trucking Industry
Prior to 1900, most freight was carried by trains, which could move large amounts of products, but only to urban areas where the items were then transported by horse-drawn wagons. The earliest trucks were often more popular for their advertising space than carrying freight. A lack of paved roads in rural areas, small engines and limited capacities made trucks less desirable.
 
By 1910, the gasoline-powered internal combustion engine, improved transmissions, introduction of gear drives, and tractor and semi-trailers helped to greatly improve the popularity of trucking across the country. Within four years, almost 100,000 trucks were hitting the roads of America. The trucking industry still had its problems, as road conditions were still poor and the maximum speed limit in many areas was only 15 miles per hour.
 
During World War I, railroads became overloaded helping the war effort, and the need for an improved trucking industry became apparent. It was at this time that Roy Chapin experimented with the first long-distance truck shipments and inflated tires able to carry heavier loads, allowing trucks to drive at higher speeds. By 1920, more than one million trucks traveled America’s roads. 
 
The trucking industry continued to flourish with the introduction of the diesel engine, improved roads, standardized truck and trailer sizes, fifth wheel coupling systems, and power brakes and steering.