#1054A – 1960 Liberty Series Coil Stamps - 1 1/4¢ Palace of Governors

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U.S. #1054A
1 1/4¢ Palace of the Governors
Liberty Series Coil Stamp
 
Issue Date: June 17, 1960
City: Santa Fe, NM
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press Coil
Perforations:
10 Horizontally
Color: Turquoise
 
U.S. #1054A pictures the Palace of the Governors in Santa Fe, New Mexico. 
 
The Palace of Governors –
Oldest Government Building in the United States
Built in 1610, the Palace is the oldest public building in the U.S. It was originally part of a Spanish fort, which served as the seat of Spanish government for what is now America’s southwest. The Palace became an administrative center for the U.S. after General Stephen W. Kearny took the fort without firing a shot. A great deal of New Mexico’s history has taken place in the Palace of Governors. In 1909, the building was converted to the Palace of Governors History Museum. The museum was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960. In 1999, it officially became an American Treasure.
 
The Liberty Series
Issued to replace the 1938 Presidential series, this patriotic set of stamps honors guardians of freedom throughout U.S. history. Eighteenth century America is represented by Revolutionary War heroes and statesmen such as Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Hamilton, Henry, Jay, and Revere.
 
Leaders of the 19th century including Monroe, Lincoln, Lee, Harrison, and Susan B. Anthony make an appearance. The 20th century is represented by Teddy Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and General Pershing.
 
The Liberty Series also features famous locations important to America’s democratic history, such as Bunker Hill, Independence Hall, and the Alamo.
 
“Wet” versus “Dry” Printing
The Bureau of Engraving and Printing began an experiment in 1954. In previous “wet” printings, the paper had a moisture content of 15 to 35 percent. In the experimental “dry” printings, the paper had a moisture content of 5 to 10 percent. This process required stiffer, thicker paper, special inks, and greater pressure to force the paper through the plates.
 
Stamps produced by dry printing can be distinguished by whiter paper and higher surface sheen. The stamps feel thicker and the designs are more pronounced than on wet printings. So the dry printing experiment was a success, and all U.S. postage stamps have been printed by this method since the late 1950s.
 
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U.S. #1054A
1 1/4¢ Palace of the Governors
Liberty Series Coil Stamp
 
Issue Date: June 17, 1960
City: Santa Fe, NM
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press Coil
Perforations:
10 Horizontally
Color: Turquoise
 
U.S. #1054A pictures the Palace of the Governors in Santa Fe, New Mexico. 
 
The Palace of Governors –
Oldest Government Building in the United States
Built in 1610, the Palace is the oldest public building in the U.S. It was originally part of a Spanish fort, which served as the seat of Spanish government for what is now America’s southwest. The Palace became an administrative center for the U.S. after General Stephen W. Kearny took the fort without firing a shot. A great deal of New Mexico’s history has taken place in the Palace of Governors. In 1909, the building was converted to the Palace of Governors History Museum. The museum was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1960. In 1999, it officially became an American Treasure.
 
The Liberty Series
Issued to replace the 1938 Presidential series, this patriotic set of stamps honors guardians of freedom throughout U.S. history. Eighteenth century America is represented by Revolutionary War heroes and statesmen such as Washington, Jefferson, Franklin, Hamilton, Henry, Jay, and Revere.
 
Leaders of the 19th century including Monroe, Lincoln, Lee, Harrison, and Susan B. Anthony make an appearance. The 20th century is represented by Teddy Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and General Pershing.
 
The Liberty Series also features famous locations important to America’s democratic history, such as Bunker Hill, Independence Hall, and the Alamo.
 
“Wet” versus “Dry” Printing
The Bureau of Engraving and Printing began an experiment in 1954. In previous “wet” printings, the paper had a moisture content of 15 to 35 percent. In the experimental “dry” printings, the paper had a moisture content of 5 to 10 percent. This process required stiffer, thicker paper, special inks, and greater pressure to force the paper through the plates.
 
Stamps produced by dry printing can be distinguished by whiter paper and higher surface sheen. The stamps feel thicker and the designs are more pronounced than on wet printings. So the dry printing experiment was a success, and all U.S. postage stamps have been printed by this method since the late 1950s.