#1079 – 1956 3c King Salmon

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camera Mint Plate Block of 4
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camera Mint Sheet(s)
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- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
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- MM4202Mystic Clear Mount 45x30mm - 50 precut mounts
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U.S. #1079
1956 3¢ King Salmon
Wildlife Conservation
 
Issue Date: November 9, 1956
City:  Seattle, Washington
Quantity: 109,275,000
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10 ½ 
Color:  Blue green
 
The third Wildlife Conservation in America stamps issued in 1956, U.S. #1079 pictures king salmon. Also known as the Chinook salmon, this species is the state fish of Alaska – which wasn’t a U.S. state when this stamp was issued. 
 
The king salmon has an important role in the culture of some Native American tribes. The species is fished for sport and commerce, although its numbers are closely monitored by protection groups. 
 
Salmon Conservation
Salmon are one of the most important food and sport fishes. The largest type of salmon, king salmon usually weigh about 22 pounds and are around three-feet long. These large fish are born in fresh water, but most eventually swim to the ocean. Most return to spawn in the same stream in which they were hatched.
 
Great efforts have been made to preserve salmon populations and the environment they need to survive. Pollution has been reduced. Fish ladders allow the fish to cross dams and other man-made obstacles. Improved hatcheries produce thousands of healthy salmon to restock rivers and lakes.
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U.S. #1079
1956 3¢ King Salmon
Wildlife Conservation
 
Issue Date: November 9, 1956
City:  Seattle, Washington
Quantity: 109,275,000
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10 ½ 
Color:  Blue green
 
The third Wildlife Conservation in America stamps issued in 1956, U.S. #1079 pictures king salmon. Also known as the Chinook salmon, this species is the state fish of Alaska – which wasn’t a U.S. state when this stamp was issued. 
 
The king salmon has an important role in the culture of some Native American tribes. The species is fished for sport and commerce, although its numbers are closely monitored by protection groups. 
 
Salmon Conservation
Salmon are one of the most important food and sport fishes. The largest type of salmon, king salmon usually weigh about 22 pounds and are around three-feet long. These large fish are born in fresh water, but most eventually swim to the ocean. Most return to spawn in the same stream in which they were hatched.
 
Great efforts have been made to preserve salmon populations and the environment they need to survive. Pollution has been reduced. Fish ladders allow the fish to cross dams and other man-made obstacles. Improved hatcheries produce thousands of healthy salmon to restock rivers and lakes.