#1114 – 1959 3¢ Bust of Lincoln

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U.S. #1114
1958-59 3¢ Abraham Lincoln

Issue Date: February 27, 1959
City:  New York, New York
Quantity: 91,160,200
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Rotary Press
Perforations: 
10 ½ x 11
Color:  Purple
 
Part of the Lincoln Sesquicentennial Series, this stamp design is based on a marble sculpture of Lincoln's head, by Gutzon Borglum in 1906. The sculpture sits in the Rotunda of the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.
 
Abraham Lincoln’s Legal Career
According to tradition, Lincoln was a homespun, folksy country lawyer, always ready with a humorous story.  However, historic documents reveal a polished attorney who had one of the largest appellate practices in Illinois by the 1850s, with more than 5,000 cases in a 23-year career.
 
Denied a complete formal education, Lincoln was largely self-educated.  When he was appointed the postmaster of New Salem, Illinois, he relished the opportunity to read incoming newspapers at no charge.
 
Lincoln was elected to the Illinois state legislature in 1834 and began to study law.  Admitted to the bar in 1837, he moved to Springfield and earned a reputation as a formidable opponent.  Lincoln also served as a circuit court judge, constantly traveling over a sprawling jurisdiction.
 
A landmark civil case, Hurd v. Rock Island Bridge Company, won Lincoln fame within the legal community.  The case helped boost Western expansion by establishing the right of land routes to bridge waterways.
 
Lincoln planned to continue practicing law after his presidential term.  Shortly before he left Springfield for his inauguration, Lincoln told his law partner, “If I live I’m coming back some time and then we’ll go right on practising law as if nothing had ever happened.”
 
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U.S. #1114
1958-59 3¢ Abraham Lincoln

Issue Date: February 27, 1959
City:  New York, New York
Quantity: 91,160,200
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Rotary Press
Perforations: 
10 ½ x 11
Color:  Purple
 
Part of the Lincoln Sesquicentennial Series, this stamp design is based on a marble sculpture of Lincoln's head, by Gutzon Borglum in 1906. The sculpture sits in the Rotunda of the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.
 
Abraham Lincoln’s Legal Career
According to tradition, Lincoln was a homespun, folksy country lawyer, always ready with a humorous story.  However, historic documents reveal a polished attorney who had one of the largest appellate practices in Illinois by the 1850s, with more than 5,000 cases in a 23-year career.
 
Denied a complete formal education, Lincoln was largely self-educated.  When he was appointed the postmaster of New Salem, Illinois, he relished the opportunity to read incoming newspapers at no charge.
 
Lincoln was elected to the Illinois state legislature in 1834 and began to study law.  Admitted to the bar in 1837, he moved to Springfield and earned a reputation as a formidable opponent.  Lincoln also served as a circuit court judge, constantly traveling over a sprawling jurisdiction.
 
A landmark civil case, Hurd v. Rock Island Bridge Company, won Lincoln fame within the legal community.  The case helped boost Western expansion by establishing the right of land routes to bridge waterways.
 
Lincoln planned to continue practicing law after his presidential term.  Shortly before he left Springfield for his inauguration, Lincoln told his law partner, “If I live I’m coming back some time and then we’ll go right on practising law as if nothing had ever happened.”