#1179 – 1962 4c Battle of Shiloh

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.60
$0.60
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.15
$0.15
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
$7.50
- MM50150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 30 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM4202Mystic Clear Mount 45x30mm - 50 precut drop end mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
$1.95
 
U.S. #1179
4¢ Shiloh
Civil War Centennial Series
 
Issue Date: April 7, 1962
City: Shiloh, TN
Quantity: 124,865,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10 1/2
Color: Black on peach blossom
 
U.S. #1179 commemorates the Battle of Shiloh. The stamp shows a Civil War rifleman ducking behind a tree stump. The stamp was printed on peach blossom colored paper to honor the fact that an important part of the battle was fought in a peach orchard.
 
The Battle of Shiloh
The Battle of Shiloh was fought in Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee, a village 20 miles north of Corinth. Union General Ulysses S. Grant stopped there while moving his troops down the Tennessee River. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston decided on a surprise attack on Grant’s 42,000 troops with his 40,000 men.
 
The battle, named after a church on the battlefield, was fought on April 6 and 7, 1862. On the first day, Johnston’s surprise attack nearly smashed through Grant’s defenses. Johnston was killed in the fighting. The next day, Grant was reinforced with troops, and the general drove the Confederates to Corinth. About 13,000 Union troops and nearly 11,000 Confederate troops died at the battle.
 
Many Northerners were outraged by the loss of life and called for Grant’s replacement. President Abraham Lincoln refused, stating, “I can’t spare this man – he fights.”
 
Read More - Click Here


  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2018 50¢ The Art of Magic souvenir sheet Get The 2018 ‘Art Of Magic’ Souvenir Sheet with Special Animation Effect

    Own a mint souvenir sheet of three Art of Magic stamps featuring a white rabbit seeming to appear and disappear out of a black top hat.  The special animation effect was created using lenticular printing and makes this souvenir sheet a fun addition to your collection.  Get yours now.

    $3.95- $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit Give Your Grandchildren the Gift of Stamp Collecting

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1179
4¢ Shiloh
Civil War Centennial Series
 
Issue Date: April 7, 1962
City: Shiloh, TN
Quantity: 124,865,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10 1/2
Color: Black on peach blossom
 
U.S. #1179 commemorates the Battle of Shiloh. The stamp shows a Civil War rifleman ducking behind a tree stump. The stamp was printed on peach blossom colored paper to honor the fact that an important part of the battle was fought in a peach orchard.
 
The Battle of Shiloh
The Battle of Shiloh was fought in Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee, a village 20 miles north of Corinth. Union General Ulysses S. Grant stopped there while moving his troops down the Tennessee River. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston decided on a surprise attack on Grant’s 42,000 troops with his 40,000 men.
 
The battle, named after a church on the battlefield, was fought on April 6 and 7, 1862. On the first day, Johnston’s surprise attack nearly smashed through Grant’s defenses. Johnston was killed in the fighting. The next day, Grant was reinforced with troops, and the general drove the Confederates to Corinth. About 13,000 Union troops and nearly 11,000 Confederate troops died at the battle.
 
Many Northerners were outraged by the loss of life and called for Grant’s replacement. President Abraham Lincoln refused, stating, “I can’t spare this man – he fights.”