#1200 – 1962 4c Senator Brien McMahon

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.60FREE with 120 points!
$0.60
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50145x30mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1200
1962 4¢ Brien McMahon
 
Issue Date: July 28, 1962
City: Norwalk, Connecticut
Quantity: 130,960,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Purple
 
U.S.#1200 features Connecticut Senator Brien McMahon (1903-52), who was best known for his support of the peaceful uses of atomic energy. The stamp was issued on the 10-year anniversary of McMahon’s death.
 

Death Of Brien McMahon

Connecticut Senator and chairman of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy Brien McMahon died on July 28, 1952, in Washington, D.C.

McMahon was born on October 6, 1903, in Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut. After graduating from Yale law school he practiced law, and then became a city judge in 1933. He went on to serve as a special assistant to the Attorney General of the United States and later Assistant Attorney General of the U.S., in charge of the Department of Justice Criminal Division.

In 1944, McMahon was elected to the U.S. Senate. He was re-elected in 1950, and served until his death. McMahon served as chairman of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. In 1945 he introduced a bill that would put control and development of nuclear technology into civilian, rather than military, hands. President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act of 1946 (sometimes called the McMahon Act) establishing the United States Atomic Energy Commission. The AEC directed the development and use of atomic energy for both military and civilian purposes.

In 1952, McMahon proposed the creation of an “army” of young Americans to serve as “missionaries of democracy.” The proposal served as one of the inspirations for the Peace Corps, established in 1961.

Also in 1952, McMahon launched a campaign to run for president. His slogan was “The Man is McMahon” and his slogan “to insure world peace through fear of atomic weapons.” However, he was soon diagnosed with cancer and died on July 28, 1952.

Read More - Click Here


  • 1998-2019 U.S. Semi-Postal Stamps, plus FREE 2014 Imperforate Semi-Postal, 8 stamps 1998-2019 U.S. Semi-Postal Stamps

    Semi-postal stamps are issued to serve a double purpose.  Priced higher than regular postage, they pay the current mailing rate plus an added amount contributed to a charitable cause.  As of 2019, eight semi-postal (sometimes called "fundraising") stamps had been issued.  Now you can get them in one easy order and receive the B5a imperforate semi-postal FREE!

    $13.50
    BUY NOW
  • 1990s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 100 First Day Covers Issued During the 1990s
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers highlighted Looney Tunes characters, statehood anniversaries, Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, Elvis Presley, Dorothy Parker, and more.  Order your set today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1922-32 Regular Issues, 24 stamps, used 1922-32 Regular Issues, 24 used stamps

    This set of 24 postally used 1922-32 regular issues stamps is a great addition to your collection. Order today to receive: 571, 610, 632, 634, 635, 636, 637, 638, 639, 640, 641, 642, 653,684, 685, 692, 693, 694, 697, 698, 699, 700, 701, and 720.

    $6.25
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1200
1962 4¢ Brien McMahon
 
Issue Date: July 28, 1962
City: Norwalk, Connecticut
Quantity: 130,960,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Purple
 
U.S.#1200 features Connecticut Senator Brien McMahon (1903-52), who was best known for his support of the peaceful uses of atomic energy. The stamp was issued on the 10-year anniversary of McMahon’s death.
 

Death Of Brien McMahon

Connecticut Senator and chairman of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy Brien McMahon died on July 28, 1952, in Washington, D.C.

McMahon was born on October 6, 1903, in Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut. After graduating from Yale law school he practiced law, and then became a city judge in 1933. He went on to serve as a special assistant to the Attorney General of the United States and later Assistant Attorney General of the U.S., in charge of the Department of Justice Criminal Division.

In 1944, McMahon was elected to the U.S. Senate. He was re-elected in 1950, and served until his death. McMahon served as chairman of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. In 1945 he introduced a bill that would put control and development of nuclear technology into civilian, rather than military, hands. President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act of 1946 (sometimes called the McMahon Act) establishing the United States Atomic Energy Commission. The AEC directed the development and use of atomic energy for both military and civilian purposes.

In 1952, McMahon proposed the creation of an “army” of young Americans to serve as “missionaries of democracy.” The proposal served as one of the inspirations for the Peace Corps, established in 1961.

Also in 1952, McMahon launched a campaign to run for president. His slogan was “The Man is McMahon” and his slogan “to insure world peace through fear of atomic weapons.” However, he was soon diagnosed with cancer and died on July 28, 1952.