#1200 – 1962 4c Sen. Brien McMahon

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.60
$0.60
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.15
$0.15
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
$7.50
- MM50150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 30 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM4202Mystic Clear Mount 45x30mm - 50 precut mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
$1.95
 
U.S. #1200
1962 4¢ Brien McMahon
 
Issue Date: July 28, 1962
City: Norwalk, Connecticut
Quantity: 130,960,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Purple
 
U.S.#1200 features Connecticut Senator Brien McMahon (1903-52), who was best known for his support of the peaceful uses of atomic energy. The stamp was issued on the 10-year anniversary of McMahon’s death.
 
McMahon was born in Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut. After graduating from Yale law school he practiced law, and then became a city judge in 1933. McMahon resigned to become a special assistant to the Attorney General of the United States from 1933-35. From 1935-39, he served as Assistant Attorney General of the U.S., in charge of the Department of Justice Criminal Division.
 
In 1944, McMahon was elected to the U.S. Senate. He was re-elected in 1950, and served until his death on July 28, 1952.  McMahon served as chairman of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. He also authored the McMahon Act for the control of atomic energy, which resulted in the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in 1946. The AEC directed the development and use of atomic energy for both military and civilian purposes.
 
In 1952, McMahon proposed the creation of an “army” of young Americans to serve as “missionaries of democracy.” The proposal served as one of the inspirations for the Peace Corps, established in 1961.
 
 
Read More - Click Here

  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2017 Commemorative Year Set 2017 U.S. Commemorative Year Set

    Get every US commemorative stamp issued in 2017.  Each stamp showcases important history, people, and events from American culture.  With this set you'll receive stamps from popular series like Lunar New Year and Love.  Plus you'll receive the Nebraska and Mississippi Statehood stamps, Dorothy Height, John F. Kennedy, and more.  It's the convenient and affordable way to keep your collection up to date.

    $31.95- $55.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

    $450.00- $7,395.00
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1200
1962 4¢ Brien McMahon
 
Issue Date: July 28, 1962
City: Norwalk, Connecticut
Quantity: 130,960,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Purple
 
U.S.#1200 features Connecticut Senator Brien McMahon (1903-52), who was best known for his support of the peaceful uses of atomic energy. The stamp was issued on the 10-year anniversary of McMahon’s death.
 
McMahon was born in Norwalk, Fairfield County, Connecticut. After graduating from Yale law school he practiced law, and then became a city judge in 1933. McMahon resigned to become a special assistant to the Attorney General of the United States from 1933-35. From 1935-39, he served as Assistant Attorney General of the U.S., in charge of the Department of Justice Criminal Division.
 
In 1944, McMahon was elected to the U.S. Senate. He was re-elected in 1950, and served until his death on July 28, 1952.  McMahon served as chairman of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy. He also authored the McMahon Act for the control of atomic energy, which resulted in the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in 1946. The AEC directed the development and use of atomic energy for both military and civilian purposes.
 
In 1952, McMahon proposed the creation of an “army” of young Americans to serve as “missionaries of democracy.” The proposal served as one of the inspirations for the Peace Corps, established in 1961.