#1213 – 1962 5c George Washington

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U.S. #1213
5¢ Washington
 
Issue Date: November 23, 1962
City: New York, NY
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Dark blue gray
 
The 1962-66 5¢ Regular Issue stamp depicts George Washington, America’s first President. Remembered primarily for his role in the American Revolution, Washington also had a earier record of service to Great Britain.
 
Washington’s Early Military Experiences
Although Washington had no military experience, he requested a commission from the governor of Virginia. He was given the rank of major in February 1753. The young man immediately began studying military books to learn tactics and conduct.
 
Washington’s first military action came as he served in the French and Indian War. He delivered messages of war to the French in the wilderness of the Ohio River Valley, and was nearly killed twice. Promoted to lieutenant colonel, he built Fort Necessity, but was forced to surrender it to the French. Although he resigned from service when he learned all Colonials were being reduced in rank, in March 1755, he served under British Major General Edward Braddock as an aide. Washington was nearly killed when Braddock’s troops were ambushed by the French and Indians. Washington accepted a new commission as colonel in 1755, and commanded Virginia’s Colonial troops in defense of the colony’s western frontier from Indian attacks. Washington also marched his troops to take Fort Duquesne from the French in 1758. By the time Washington arrived, the French had burned the fort and retreated to Canada.
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U.S. #1213
5¢ Washington
 
Issue Date: November 23, 1962
City: New York, NY
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Dark blue gray
 
The 1962-66 5¢ Regular Issue stamp depicts George Washington, America’s first President. Remembered primarily for his role in the American Revolution, Washington also had a earier record of service to Great Britain.
 
Washington’s Early Military Experiences
Although Washington had no military experience, he requested a commission from the governor of Virginia. He was given the rank of major in February 1753. The young man immediately began studying military books to learn tactics and conduct.
 
Washington’s first military action came as he served in the French and Indian War. He delivered messages of war to the French in the wilderness of the Ohio River Valley, and was nearly killed twice. Promoted to lieutenant colonel, he built Fort Necessity, but was forced to surrender it to the French. Although he resigned from service when he learned all Colonials were being reduced in rank, in March 1755, he served under British Major General Edward Braddock as an aide. Washington was nearly killed when Braddock’s troops were ambushed by the French and Indians. Washington accepted a new commission as colonel in 1755, and commanded Virginia’s Colonial troops in defense of the colony’s western frontier from Indian attacks. Washington also marched his troops to take Fort Duquesne from the French in 1758. By the time Washington arrived, the French had burned the fort and retreated to Canada.