#1242 – 1964 5c Sam Houston

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U.S. #1242
5¢ Sam Houston
 
Issue Date: January 10, 1964
City: Houston, TX
Quantity: 125,995,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
10 1/2 x 11
Color: Black
 
U.S. #1242 honors Texas hero Sam Houston. The stamp shows a reproduction of an 1848 lithograph by F. Davignon. The stamp’s designer, Texas artist Tom Lea, drew Houston a few years younger, as he looked as the first President of the Republic of Texas.
 
Sam Houston (1793-1863)
Soldier and Statesman
Sam Houston was born in Virginia, moved to Tennessee at 13, ran away at 15, and then lived with Cherokee Indians for about three years. He started a country school, fought the Creek Indians under Andrew Jackson’s command, studied law, established a practice, and became the district attorney for the Nashville district. In 1823, he was elected to Congress. Four years later, he became governor of Tennessee. Houston resigned from the governorship in 1829, after his wife left him. He moved to Arkansas and again lived with the Cherokee. Later, he relocated to Nacogdoches, Texas. At that time, Texas was a part of Mexico.
 
In 1836, Houston became one of the leaders in Texas’ movement for independence from Mexico. He organized an army and became its commander in chief. In April 1836, he defeated the Mexican army under the command of General Antonio López de Santa Anna, at the Battle of San Jacinto. Mexico was forced to recognize Texas as independent.
 
Houston became the first president of the Republic of Texas. He served from 1836-38 and then again from 1841-44. One of his main goals was to have Texas admitted as a U.S. state. Houston succeeded in 1845. From 1846-59, he served as a Texas senator. 
 
Historians note that Houston disagreed with many Southern leaders on the issues leading up to the Civil War. In 1859, Houston ran for governor of Texas on a ticket that opposed secession from the Union. However, in 1861, Texas voted to secede. Governor Houston refused and subsequently was removed from office. He retired to private life and passed away two years later.
 
The city of Houston, Texas, founded in 1836, was named in honor of this great Texan.
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U.S. #1242
5¢ Sam Houston
 
Issue Date: January 10, 1964
City: Houston, TX
Quantity: 125,995,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
10 1/2 x 11
Color: Black
 
U.S. #1242 honors Texas hero Sam Houston. The stamp shows a reproduction of an 1848 lithograph by F. Davignon. The stamp’s designer, Texas artist Tom Lea, drew Houston a few years younger, as he looked as the first President of the Republic of Texas.
 
Sam Houston (1793-1863)
Soldier and Statesman
Sam Houston was born in Virginia, moved to Tennessee at 13, ran away at 15, and then lived with Cherokee Indians for about three years. He started a country school, fought the Creek Indians under Andrew Jackson’s command, studied law, established a practice, and became the district attorney for the Nashville district. In 1823, he was elected to Congress. Four years later, he became governor of Tennessee. Houston resigned from the governorship in 1829, after his wife left him. He moved to Arkansas and again lived with the Cherokee. Later, he relocated to Nacogdoches, Texas. At that time, Texas was a part of Mexico.
 
In 1836, Houston became one of the leaders in Texas’ movement for independence from Mexico. He organized an army and became its commander in chief. In April 1836, he defeated the Mexican army under the command of General Antonio López de Santa Anna, at the Battle of San Jacinto. Mexico was forced to recognize Texas as independent.
 
Houston became the first president of the Republic of Texas. He served from 1836-38 and then again from 1841-44. One of his main goals was to have Texas admitted as a U.S. state. Houston succeeded in 1845. From 1846-59, he served as a Texas senator. 
 
Historians note that Houston disagreed with many Southern leaders on the issues leading up to the Civil War. In 1859, Houston ran for governor of Texas on a ticket that opposed secession from the Union. However, in 1861, Texas voted to secede. Governor Houston refused and subsequently was removed from office. He retired to private life and passed away two years later.
 
The city of Houston, Texas, founded in 1836, was named in honor of this great Texan.