#1260 – 1964 5c Amateur Radio

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.65FREE with 130 points!
$0.65
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM50230x45mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420330x45mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1260
5¢ Amateur Radio
 
Issue Date: December 15, 1964
City: Anchorage, AK
Quantity: 122,230,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
10 1/2 x 11
Color: Red lilac
 
U.S. #1260 honors America’s amateur radio operators, of which there were about 250,000 in 1964. Issued on the 50th anniversary of the founding of the American Radio Relay League, it pictures a radio broadcast wave and radio dial. 
 
 

American Radio Relay League Saves Lives 

On March 28, 1964, amateur radio operators provided essential emergency communications in the wake of a devastating earthquake in Alaska.

The idea for the American Radio Relay League came from Hiram Percy Maxim of Hartford, Connecticut.  One night in April 1914, he wanted to send a message to a friend 30 miles away in Springfield, but was unable to reach him.  From this, the idea struck Maxim to create an organized relay system for radio amateurs.

A few days later, Maxim attended a meeting of his local radio club and suggested the creation of an American Radio Relay League.  The club agreed and the American Radio Relay League was formed on April 6, 1914.  In the coming months, they sent out applications to every amateur radio station they knew of, and by that September, they established a network of more than 230 stations.

Over the next 50 years, the league’s membership grew across the country, reaching all the way to Alaska.  Then, just days before the group’s 50th anniversary, a major natural disaster brought the Amateur Radio Relay League into the spotlight.

On March 27, 1964, the largest earthquake in the history of the United States struck Alaska, greatly damaging Anchorage, Valdez, and the surrounding areas.  The earthquake, which measured a magnitude of 9.2, caused widespread destruction.  In conjunction with the ensuing tsunami (tidal wave) it caused, the quake took nearly 140 lives.

On March 27 and March 28, in the aftermath of this natural disaster, amateur radio operators provided essential emergency communications, which greatly aided relief and rescue operations.  Amateur radio operators, often referred to as “hams,” continue to serve during emergency situations, especially in places with such sparsely populated areas as Alaska.  Today, the Amateur Radio League has 154,000 members in the US, as well as 7,000 in other countries.

 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamp - Holiday Delights 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Holiday Delights

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 4 new Forever stamps picturing Holiday Delights.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $4.50- $26.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2019 Giant US Commemorative Collection, 212 mint stamps 2019 Giant US Commemorative Collection of 212 Mint Stamps
    Save time and money with this year-set.  You'll receive every US commemorative stamp with a major Scott number issued in 2019 in one order.  Plus, get the seven mint sheets pictured in our 2019 Heirloom Supplement.  It's the easy way to keep your collection up to date. 
    $219.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Definitive Collection - 650 Used Stamps US Definitive Collection - 650 Used Stamps
    Act now to get an instant collection of 650 used U.S. definitive stamps in one easy order! Definitive stamps are the backbone of the U.S. postal system and essential additions to your collection. Take advantage of this money-saving offer and make your collection grow fast.
    $32.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1260
5¢ Amateur Radio
 
Issue Date: December 15, 1964
City: Anchorage, AK
Quantity: 122,230,000
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
10 1/2 x 11
Color: Red lilac
 
U.S. #1260 honors America’s amateur radio operators, of which there were about 250,000 in 1964. Issued on the 50th anniversary of the founding of the American Radio Relay League, it pictures a radio broadcast wave and radio dial. 
 
 

American Radio Relay League Saves Lives 

On March 28, 1964, amateur radio operators provided essential emergency communications in the wake of a devastating earthquake in Alaska.

The idea for the American Radio Relay League came from Hiram Percy Maxim of Hartford, Connecticut.  One night in April 1914, he wanted to send a message to a friend 30 miles away in Springfield, but was unable to reach him.  From this, the idea struck Maxim to create an organized relay system for radio amateurs.

A few days later, Maxim attended a meeting of his local radio club and suggested the creation of an American Radio Relay League.  The club agreed and the American Radio Relay League was formed on April 6, 1914.  In the coming months, they sent out applications to every amateur radio station they knew of, and by that September, they established a network of more than 230 stations.

Over the next 50 years, the league’s membership grew across the country, reaching all the way to Alaska.  Then, just days before the group’s 50th anniversary, a major natural disaster brought the Amateur Radio Relay League into the spotlight.

On March 27, 1964, the largest earthquake in the history of the United States struck Alaska, greatly damaging Anchorage, Valdez, and the surrounding areas.  The earthquake, which measured a magnitude of 9.2, caused widespread destruction.  In conjunction with the ensuing tsunami (tidal wave) it caused, the quake took nearly 140 lives.

On March 27 and March 28, in the aftermath of this natural disaster, amateur radio operators provided essential emergency communications, which greatly aided relief and rescue operations.  Amateur radio operators, often referred to as “hams,” continue to serve during emergency situations, especially in places with such sparsely populated areas as Alaska.  Today, the Amateur Radio League has 154,000 members in the US, as well as 7,000 in other countries.