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#1293 – 1968 50c Lucy Stone

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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camera Mint Plate Block of 4
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camera Mint Sheet
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camera Classic First Day Cover
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camera First Day Cover Plate Block of 4
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camera Fleetwood First Day Cover
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- Fleetwood First Day Cover (plate block)
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Grading Guide
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- Mystic Black Mount Size 27/31 (50)
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U.S. #1293
50¢ Lucy Stone
Prominent Americans Series
 
Issue Date: August 13, 1968
City: Dorchester, MA
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary Press
Color: Rose magenta
 
Prominent Americans Series
The Prominent Americans Series recognizes people who played important roles in U.S. history. Officials originally planned to honor 18 individuals, but later added seven others. The Prominent Americans Series began with the 4¢ Lincoln stamp, which was issued on November 10, 1965. During the course of the series, the 6¢ Eisenhower stamp was reissued with an 8¢ denomination and the 5¢ Washington was redrawn.
 
A number of technological changes developed during the course of producing the series, resulting in a number of varieties due to gum, luminescence, precancels and perforations plus sheet, coil and booklet formats. Additionally, seven rate changes occurred while the Prominent Americans Series was current, giving collectors who specialize in first and last day of issue covers an abundance of collecting opportunities.
 
The 50¢ Prominent Americans stamp honors Lucy Stone. The first woman included in the Prominent American series, Lucy Stone championed the women's suffrage and anti-slavery movements. After her marriage to noted abolitionist, Henry Blackwell, she continued to use her maiden name to support her claim, "There is no law that requires a wife to take her husband's name.