#1305b – 1965-78 6c Franklin D. Roosevelt,precncl

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U.S. #1305b
6¢ Franklin Roosevelt
Prominent Americans Series Coil
 
Issue Date: February 28, 1968
City: Washington, DC
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary Press
Perforation: 10 vertically
Color: Gray brown
 
Prominent Americans Series
The Prominent Americans Series recognizes people who played important roles in U.S. history. Officials originally planned to honor 18 individuals, but later added seven others. The Prominent Americans Series began with the 4¢ Lincoln stamp, which was issued on November 10, 1965. During the course of the series, the 6¢ Eisenhower stamp was reissued with an 8¢ denomination and the 5¢ Washington was redrawn.
 
A number of technological changes developed during the course of producing the series, resulting in a number of varieties due to gum, luminescence, precancels and perforations plus sheet, coil and booklet formats. Additionally, seven rate changes occurred while the Prominent Americans Series was current, giving collectors who specialize in first and last day of issue covers an abundance of collecting opportunities.  U.S. #1305b differs from other varieties in that it is untagged and pre-canceled by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.
 
The 6¢ denomination features Franklin D. Roosevelt as its subject. Elected president four times, Roosevelt (1882-1945) served in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. He was born on January 30, 1882, in Hyde Park, the only child in a wealthy family. Roosevelt studied at Columbia Law School. In 1910, he was elected to the New York state senate. 
 
He was appointed assistant secretary of the navy in 1913. Roosevelt was stricken with polio in 1921. Although permanently disabled, he remained active in politics. In 1928, Roosevelt was elected governor of New York – he was re-elected in 1930. As the Great Depression ravaged America in 1932, he was elected president over President Herbert Hoover.
 
President Roosevelt quickly began to use the power of the federal government to repair the nation’s failed economy. He introduced a sweeping economic program that provided relief, loans, and jobs, as well as other means of stimulating the economy, under the heading of the “New Deal.” Roosevelt was overwhelmingly re-elected in 1936, as the public rallied behind his innovative policies.
 
The President was determined to keep America out of the European conflict, but when World War II began, he provided aid to Great Britain. In 1940, he was elected to an unprecedented third term. With the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the U.S. entered WW II. Roosevelt declared December 7 “A date which will live in infamy.” Roosevelt’s diplomatic finesse was key in forging an alliance with Great Britain and the U.S.S.R.
 
In 1944, despite failing health, Roosevelt was elected to a fourth term. At that time, Allied forces were closing in on Germany and Japan – victory was close. However, Roosevelt did not live to see the war to its conclusion. He died on April 12, 1945 – just 83 days after his third re-election.
 

Birth Of Charles Evans Hughes 

Statesman Charles Evans Hughes was born on April 11, 1862, in Glens Falls, New York.

Hughes attended Madison (now Colgate) University before transferring to Brown University, where he graduated third in his class. He then attended Columbia Law School, from which he graduated with highest honors in 1884.

After graduating Hughes joined a law firm and was made a partner within four years. From 1891 to 1893 he took a brief break from practicing law to teach at Cornell Law School. After that, he returned to his law career, though he would also work as a special lecturer from time to time at Cornell and New York University Law School.

In 1905 Hughes was selected to join the New York legislative “Stevens Gas Commission” to look into utility rates. Hughes discovered corruption in the system and helped to lower gas rates. Hughes then ran for governor of New York in 1906, defeating William Randolph Hearst. In 1908 William Howard Taft offered him the vice presidential nomination, but he refused it to run for governor again. Theodore Roosevelt became one of his greatest supporters.

Hughes introduced sweeping changes as governor. He fought political corruption and introduced new campaign laws that made candidates keep track of their expenses (this law was then introduced in 15 other states). Hughes pushed for the Moreland Act, which ultimately allowed him to remove corrupt city and county officials from office. He also fought increase the powers of the state’s Public Service Commissions. And he reorganized the Department of Labor and established new labor laws within the state, including eight-hour days and 40-day weeks for workers under 16 as well as barring young workers from dangerous jobs. During his last year as governor Hughes signed the Worker’s Compensation Act.

In April 1910, President William Howard Taft nominated Hughes for Associate Justice to fill a vacancy. The Senate approved him and he was confirmed on May 2. As an Associate Justice, Hughes fought laissez-faire capitalism and supported the expansion of state and federal regulatory powers.

Hughes resigned from the Supreme Court to run for president in 1916. Though he had the support of Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, he lost the election (by a small margin) to Woodrow Wilson. He would return to politics five years later when Warren G. Harding appointed him Secretary of State. In that role he attended the Washington Naval Conference and signed an agreement ending America’s occupation of the Dominican Republic.

Hughes remained in his post for part of Calvin Coolidge’s term as president but eventually resigned. He then served as president of the New York State Bar Association and as a judge on the Court of International Justice, as well as practicing law with his former firm. Then in 1930, Herbert Hoover appointed him Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Hughes went on to lead the Supreme Court through a difficult time, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt introduced a great deal of legislation the justices found unconstitutional. Hughes retired from the court in 1941. Click here to read about some of the significant cases from his tenure.

Hughes died on August 27, 1948, in Osterville, Massachusetts.

 
 
 
 
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U.S. #1305b
6¢ Franklin Roosevelt
Prominent Americans Series Coil
 
Issue Date: February 28, 1968
City: Washington, DC
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary Press
Perforation: 10 vertically
Color: Gray brown
 
Prominent Americans Series
The Prominent Americans Series recognizes people who played important roles in U.S. history. Officials originally planned to honor 18 individuals, but later added seven others. The Prominent Americans Series began with the 4¢ Lincoln stamp, which was issued on November 10, 1965. During the course of the series, the 6¢ Eisenhower stamp was reissued with an 8¢ denomination and the 5¢ Washington was redrawn.
 
A number of technological changes developed during the course of producing the series, resulting in a number of varieties due to gum, luminescence, precancels and perforations plus sheet, coil and booklet formats. Additionally, seven rate changes occurred while the Prominent Americans Series was current, giving collectors who specialize in first and last day of issue covers an abundance of collecting opportunities.  U.S. #1305b differs from other varieties in that it is untagged and pre-canceled by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.
 
The 6¢ denomination features Franklin D. Roosevelt as its subject. Elected president four times, Roosevelt (1882-1945) served in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. He was born on January 30, 1882, in Hyde Park, the only child in a wealthy family. Roosevelt studied at Columbia Law School. In 1910, he was elected to the New York state senate. 
 
He was appointed assistant secretary of the navy in 1913. Roosevelt was stricken with polio in 1921. Although permanently disabled, he remained active in politics. In 1928, Roosevelt was elected governor of New York – he was re-elected in 1930. As the Great Depression ravaged America in 1932, he was elected president over President Herbert Hoover.
 
President Roosevelt quickly began to use the power of the federal government to repair the nation’s failed economy. He introduced a sweeping economic program that provided relief, loans, and jobs, as well as other means of stimulating the economy, under the heading of the “New Deal.” Roosevelt was overwhelmingly re-elected in 1936, as the public rallied behind his innovative policies.
 
The President was determined to keep America out of the European conflict, but when World War II began, he provided aid to Great Britain. In 1940, he was elected to an unprecedented third term. With the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the U.S. entered WW II. Roosevelt declared December 7 “A date which will live in infamy.” Roosevelt’s diplomatic finesse was key in forging an alliance with Great Britain and the U.S.S.R.
 
In 1944, despite failing health, Roosevelt was elected to a fourth term. At that time, Allied forces were closing in on Germany and Japan – victory was close. However, Roosevelt did not live to see the war to its conclusion. He died on April 12, 1945 – just 83 days after his third re-election.
 

Birth Of Charles Evans Hughes 

Statesman Charles Evans Hughes was born on April 11, 1862, in Glens Falls, New York.

Hughes attended Madison (now Colgate) University before transferring to Brown University, where he graduated third in his class. He then attended Columbia Law School, from which he graduated with highest honors in 1884.

After graduating Hughes joined a law firm and was made a partner within four years. From 1891 to 1893 he took a brief break from practicing law to teach at Cornell Law School. After that, he returned to his law career, though he would also work as a special lecturer from time to time at Cornell and New York University Law School.

In 1905 Hughes was selected to join the New York legislative “Stevens Gas Commission” to look into utility rates. Hughes discovered corruption in the system and helped to lower gas rates. Hughes then ran for governor of New York in 1906, defeating William Randolph Hearst. In 1908 William Howard Taft offered him the vice presidential nomination, but he refused it to run for governor again. Theodore Roosevelt became one of his greatest supporters.

Hughes introduced sweeping changes as governor. He fought political corruption and introduced new campaign laws that made candidates keep track of their expenses (this law was then introduced in 15 other states). Hughes pushed for the Moreland Act, which ultimately allowed him to remove corrupt city and county officials from office. He also fought increase the powers of the state’s Public Service Commissions. And he reorganized the Department of Labor and established new labor laws within the state, including eight-hour days and 40-day weeks for workers under 16 as well as barring young workers from dangerous jobs. During his last year as governor Hughes signed the Worker’s Compensation Act.

In April 1910, President William Howard Taft nominated Hughes for Associate Justice to fill a vacancy. The Senate approved him and he was confirmed on May 2. As an Associate Justice, Hughes fought laissez-faire capitalism and supported the expansion of state and federal regulatory powers.

Hughes resigned from the Supreme Court to run for president in 1916. Though he had the support of Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, he lost the election (by a small margin) to Woodrow Wilson. He would return to politics five years later when Warren G. Harding appointed him Secretary of State. In that role he attended the Washington Naval Conference and signed an agreement ending America’s occupation of the Dominican Republic.

Hughes remained in his post for part of Calvin Coolidge’s term as president but eventually resigned. He then served as president of the New York State Bar Association and as a judge on the Court of International Justice, as well as practicing law with his former firm. Then in 1930, Herbert Hoover appointed him Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Hughes went on to lead the Supreme Court through a difficult time, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt introduced a great deal of legislation the justices found unconstitutional. Hughes retired from the court in 1941. Click here to read about some of the significant cases from his tenure.

Hughes died on August 27, 1948, in Osterville, Massachusetts.