#1314 – 1966 5c National Park Service

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.50
$0.50
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
4 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50145x30mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1314
1966 5¢ National Park Service
Issue Date: August 25, 1966
City: Yellowstone National Park, WY
Quantity: 119,535,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations: 11
Color: Yellow, black and green
 
Issued at Yellowstone National Park, this stamp celebrates the 50th anniversary of the United States Park Service.
 

National Park Service Established 

Decades after the first national park was created, the National Park Service (N.P.S.) was officially established on August 25, 1916.

In the 1800s, Americans began to take notice of the natural wonders around them, and some began to call for their protection. The earliest example of this is Arkansas’ Hot Springs, which was made America’s first federal reserve in 1832.

During the Civil War, conservationists became worried about the affects of commercial ventures in Yosemite and lobbied for its protection. In 1864, President Lincoln placed Yosemite under the protection of the state of California. This was the first time the U.S. government set aside park land specifically for preservation and public use.

Less than a decade later, similar concerns arose in Wyoming. Expeditions to the Yellowstone area found it was host to deep canyons, majestic waterfalls, pristine lakes, dense forests, and spectacular geysers. Concerns grew that developers would come in and charge fees to see the natural wonders, while not taking care to protect them. Then in 1872, President Ulysses S. Grant signed legislation protecting Yellowstone, and making it America’s – and the world’s – first national park.

More parks, preserves, refuges, monuments, and other pieces of land were set aside over time. However, there wasn’t a unifying organization in place to manage them. As such, many lacked funding and private companies opened hotels, railroads, ranches, and sawmills on the land, putting the natural and historical sites in danger.

Among the many calling for change was Stephen Mather, a wealthy industrialist. He launched an extensive campaign, backed by fellow industrialists, schoolchildren, newspapers, and even the National Geographic Society. Mather’s efforts paid off on August 25, 1916, when President Woodrow Wilson signed legislation establishing the National Park Service. Over time, lands were transferred to the N.P.S. from the Forest Service and War Department. Today, the National Park Service includes over 400 areas, covering more than 84 million acres, in the 50 states as well as American territories.

 
Read More - Click Here


  • 1940s First Day Covers, Collection of 60 1940s First Day Covers, Collection of 60

    The 1940s were packed with history, and this is your chance to add some of that history to your collection with 60 limited-edition First Day Covers.  You'll see Airmail stamps, commemorative stamps, and definitives.  Order yours now.

    $75.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2002 US Definitive Coll. set of 36, used 2002 US Definitive Collection, Used, 36 Stamps
    Now is a great time to add these stamps to your collection.  You’ll get 36 used stamps SAVE off the regular stamp prices.  Order your 2002 US Definitive Stamp Collection today.
    $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1887-98  Reg Issues, 12 stamps, used Classic Definitives, 12 stamps, Used

    Save time and effort with this collector's set of 12 postally used definitive stamps issued from 1887-1898.  These stamps are now all over 110 years old and represent a ton of neat history.  Order today and you'll receive 212, 219, 220, 222, 223, 226, 268, 272, 279, 280, 281 and 283.

    $30.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1314
1966 5¢ National Park Service
Issue Date: August 25, 1966
City: Yellowstone National Park, WY
Quantity: 119,535,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations: 11
Color: Yellow, black and green
 
Issued at Yellowstone National Park, this stamp celebrates the 50th anniversary of the United States Park Service.
 

National Park Service Established 

Decades after the first national park was created, the National Park Service (N.P.S.) was officially established on August 25, 1916.

In the 1800s, Americans began to take notice of the natural wonders around them, and some began to call for their protection. The earliest example of this is Arkansas’ Hot Springs, which was made America’s first federal reserve in 1832.

During the Civil War, conservationists became worried about the affects of commercial ventures in Yosemite and lobbied for its protection. In 1864, President Lincoln placed Yosemite under the protection of the state of California. This was the first time the U.S. government set aside park land specifically for preservation and public use.

Less than a decade later, similar concerns arose in Wyoming. Expeditions to the Yellowstone area found it was host to deep canyons, majestic waterfalls, pristine lakes, dense forests, and spectacular geysers. Concerns grew that developers would come in and charge fees to see the natural wonders, while not taking care to protect them. Then in 1872, President Ulysses S. Grant signed legislation protecting Yellowstone, and making it America’s – and the world’s – first national park.

More parks, preserves, refuges, monuments, and other pieces of land were set aside over time. However, there wasn’t a unifying organization in place to manage them. As such, many lacked funding and private companies opened hotels, railroads, ranches, and sawmills on the land, putting the natural and historical sites in danger.

Among the many calling for change was Stephen Mather, a wealthy industrialist. He launched an extensive campaign, backed by fellow industrialists, schoolchildren, newspapers, and even the National Geographic Society. Mather’s efforts paid off on August 25, 1916, when President Woodrow Wilson signed legislation establishing the National Park Service. Over time, lands were transferred to the N.P.S. from the Forest Service and War Department. Today, the National Park Service includes over 400 areas, covering more than 84 million acres, in the 50 states as well as American territories.