#1337 – 1967 5c Mississippi Statehood

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.60
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.15
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM50150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 30 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
- MM4202Mystic Clear Mount 45x30mm - 50 precut mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95

Issue Date:  December 11, 1967

City:  Natchez, MS

Quantity:  113,330,000

Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Printing Method:  Giori Press

Perforations:  11

Color:  Bright greenish blue, green and red brown

 

This stamp, which was issued to commemorate the state's centennial, pictures Mississippi's state flower, the magnolia.

 

Mississippi’s Road to Statehood

The Mississippi Territory was organized by Congress in 1798.  Development of the Territory began to flourish in 1804, when the United States gained control of the Mississippi River.  Economic development was also aided by Eli Whitney’s invention of the cotton gin in 1793 and the introduction of the improved Petit Gulf cottonseed in 1806.  These two advances made Mississippi one of the wealthiest territories of the period.  By 1812, the Mississippi Territory had been expanded to include all of present-day Alabama, Mississippi, and parts of Florida.

 

In early 1817, Mississippi was divided into the state of Mississippi and the Alabama Territory.  Mississippi was admitted as the 20th state of the Union later that same year, on December 10.  David Holmes was elected the first state governor.  Jackson, Mississippi, became the permanent capital city in 1822.

 

Read More - Click Here

  • Get Mystic's exclusive Historic Postage Stamps of the United States album U.S. Stamp Starter Kit – #M11986

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps – #M8104 3-Volume American Heirloom Album – #M8104

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album – #M11954

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

Issue Date:  December 11, 1967

City:  Natchez, MS

Quantity:  113,330,000

Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Printing Method:  Giori Press

Perforations:  11

Color:  Bright greenish blue, green and red brown

 

This stamp, which was issued to commemorate the state's centennial, pictures Mississippi's state flower, the magnolia.

 

Mississippi’s Road to Statehood

The Mississippi Territory was organized by Congress in 1798.  Development of the Territory began to flourish in 1804, when the United States gained control of the Mississippi River.  Economic development was also aided by Eli Whitney’s invention of the cotton gin in 1793 and the introduction of the improved Petit Gulf cottonseed in 1806.  These two advances made Mississippi one of the wealthiest territories of the period.  By 1812, the Mississippi Territory had been expanded to include all of present-day Alabama, Mississippi, and parts of Florida.

 

In early 1817, Mississippi was divided into the state of Mississippi and the Alabama Territory.  Mississippi was admitted as the 20th state of the Union later that same year, on December 10.  David Holmes was elected the first state governor.  Jackson, Mississippi, became the permanent capital city in 1822.