#1339 – 1968 6c Illinois Statehood

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.70
$0.70
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
4 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM50230x45mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420330x45mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50

Issue Date:  February 12, 1968

City:  Shawneetown, IL

Quantity:  141,350,000

Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Printing Method:  Lithographed, engraved

Perforations:  11

Color:  Dark blue, blue, red and ocher

 

This stamp was issued for the 150th anniversary of Illinois’ statehood.

 

 

Illinois Becomes The 21st State

On December 3, 1818, President James Monroe signed legislation admitting the state of Illinois to the Union.

In 1673, the governor-general of the French colonies in Canada, Louis de Buade, Compte de Frontenac, sent Father Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet to explore the Mississippi River. Marquette and Jolliet were most likely the first Europeans to reach Illinois. The men traveled south along the western border of the state and then returned north up the Illinois River. In 1675, Marquette founded a mission at an Indian village near present-day Ottawa. In 1699, French priests established the first permanent European settlement in Illinois, at Cahokia.

 

The French made Illinois part of the colony of Louisiana in 1717. In 1720, the French built Fort de Chartres on the east bank of the Mississippi, about 20 miles north of Kaskaskia. When this fort was rebuilt in the 1750s, it became the strongest in all of North America. Though remote at the time, the fighting of the French and Indian War even reached Illinois. In 1763, the British defeated the French, and Illinois came under British rule. Soon after, many French settlers in the area moved west to avoid government by the British.

Fewer than 2,000 whites lived in Illinois when the American Revolution began in Massachusetts. These people were missionaries, fur traders, farmers, and British soldiers. George Rogers Clark of Virginia led a force of frontiersmen, known as the “Big Knives,” against the British in Illinois. Rogers was able to capture Kaskaskia and Cahokia in 1778. Illinois was then made a county of Virginia.

As the representatives of the states prepared to sign the Articles of Confederation, Maryland refused to ratify the document unless Virginia – and other states that held western lands – gave up their claims. So, in 1784, Virginia gave Illinois to the Federal Government. When Congress passed the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, Illinois was made part of the Northwest Territory. In 1800, it became part of the Indiana Territory, but settlers in the far west of the state complained it was difficult for them to join in the affairs of Indiana. So on March 1, 1809, the area was established as the Illinois Territory.

In early 1818, residents began their push for statehood by petitioning Congress and drawing up a state constitution. Though they didn’t have the required 60,000 residents to achieve statehood, Illinois was admitted to the Union on December 3, 1818. However, at that time, only the southern third of the state was settled. Nathaniel Pope, the territorial governor, had the northern border pushed to its current boundary. This gave the state access to the Chicago port area, lead deposits around Galena, and the rich dairy areas of the north.

Today, more than two thirds of the state’s population lives in this northern territory. In 1837, the capital was changed to Springfield – Abraham Lincoln was the key proponent of this change.

Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Bugs Bunny 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Bugs Bunny

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 10 new Forever stamps picturing some of Bugs' most iconic costumes.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $10.95- $21.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2019 Complete Year Set of U.S. Commemoratives and Regular Issues - 116 Stamps 2019 Complete Year Set Stamps

    Save time and money with this year-set. You'll receive every major Scott number issued in 2019 – including the Priority and Express Mail stamps – in one order. It's the easy way to keep your collection up to date. 

    $126.00- $171.00
    BUY NOW
  • 1/2 lb. US Mixture, on/off paper US 1/2 Pound Stamp Mixture

    This fun mixture of U.S. stamps is made up of completely random years, and will contain both used stamps on and off paper. It is packaged by weight, and you will get a full 1/2 lb of stamps to sort through and identify- hours of fun at your kitchen table!

    $19.95
    BUY NOW

Issue Date:  February 12, 1968

City:  Shawneetown, IL

Quantity:  141,350,000

Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Printing Method:  Lithographed, engraved

Perforations:  11

Color:  Dark blue, blue, red and ocher

 

This stamp was issued for the 150th anniversary of Illinois’ statehood.

 

 

Illinois Becomes The 21st State

On December 3, 1818, President James Monroe signed legislation admitting the state of Illinois to the Union.

In 1673, the governor-general of the French colonies in Canada, Louis de Buade, Compte de Frontenac, sent Father Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet to explore the Mississippi River. Marquette and Jolliet were most likely the first Europeans to reach Illinois. The men traveled south along the western border of the state and then returned north up the Illinois River. In 1675, Marquette founded a mission at an Indian village near present-day Ottawa. In 1699, French priests established the first permanent European settlement in Illinois, at Cahokia.

 

The French made Illinois part of the colony of Louisiana in 1717. In 1720, the French built Fort de Chartres on the east bank of the Mississippi, about 20 miles north of Kaskaskia. When this fort was rebuilt in the 1750s, it became the strongest in all of North America. Though remote at the time, the fighting of the French and Indian War even reached Illinois. In 1763, the British defeated the French, and Illinois came under British rule. Soon after, many French settlers in the area moved west to avoid government by the British.

Fewer than 2,000 whites lived in Illinois when the American Revolution began in Massachusetts. These people were missionaries, fur traders, farmers, and British soldiers. George Rogers Clark of Virginia led a force of frontiersmen, known as the “Big Knives,” against the British in Illinois. Rogers was able to capture Kaskaskia and Cahokia in 1778. Illinois was then made a county of Virginia.

As the representatives of the states prepared to sign the Articles of Confederation, Maryland refused to ratify the document unless Virginia – and other states that held western lands – gave up their claims. So, in 1784, Virginia gave Illinois to the Federal Government. When Congress passed the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, Illinois was made part of the Northwest Territory. In 1800, it became part of the Indiana Territory, but settlers in the far west of the state complained it was difficult for them to join in the affairs of Indiana. So on March 1, 1809, the area was established as the Illinois Territory.

In early 1818, residents began their push for statehood by petitioning Congress and drawing up a state constitution. Though they didn’t have the required 60,000 residents to achieve statehood, Illinois was admitted to the Union on December 3, 1818. However, at that time, only the southern third of the state was settled. Nathaniel Pope, the territorial governor, had the northern border pushed to its current boundary. This gave the state access to the Chicago port area, lead deposits around Galena, and the rich dairy areas of the north.

Today, more than two thirds of the state’s population lives in this northern territory. In 1837, the capital was changed to Springfield – Abraham Lincoln was the key proponent of this change.