#1372a – 1969 6c W. C. Handy

U.S. #1372a Tagging Omitted
6¢ W.C. Handy

Issue Date:  May 17, 1969
City:  Memphis, TN
Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:  11
Color:  Violet, deep lilac and blue

Issued on the 150th anniversary of the founding of Memphis, Tennessee, this issue salutes famous composer, musician, and the man whom many consider the “inventor of the blues,” W.C. Handy.

W. C. Handy (1873-1958)
Composer and Musician

The “Father of the Blues” was born in Florence, Alabama, and later moved to Memphis, Tennessee.  Handy did not invent the blues, but was responsible for popularizing the music.  Among his famous songs are “Memphis Blues,” “Beale Street Blues,” “St. Louis Blues,” and “Joe Turner Blues.”  He wrote an autobiography, “Father of the Blues,” and a book on black musicians, “Unsung Americans Sung.”

Now you can own this stamp with rare tagging omitted.  Did you know a stamp missing its phosphorescent tagging is considered by many to be similar to a missing color error? The good news is that unlike some error stamps, untagged error stamps are affordable.

What is Phosphorescent Tagging and Why is it Important?

Tagging of U.S. stamps was introduced in 1963 with airmail stamp #C64a. It helps the U.S. Post Office use automation to move the mail at a lower cost. A virtually invisible phosphorescent material is applied either to stamp ink or paper, or to stamps after printing. This “taggant” causes each one to glow in shades of green (red on older airmails) for a moment after exposure to short-wave ultraviolet (UV) light. The afterglow makes it possible for facing-canceling machines to locate the stamp on the mail piece, and properly position it for automated cancellation and sorting.

Some stamps have been printed with and without tagging intentionally, but when tagging is omitted by accident, we collectors are treated to a scarce modern color error. Our stamp experts examined thousands of stamps to find these just for you. Now you can easily give your error collection a boost or explore this fascinating new area of collecting. Quantities are limited, so order your untagged error stamp right away.

And find more tagging omitted stamps here.

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U.S. #1372a Tagging Omitted
6¢ W.C. Handy

Issue Date:  May 17, 1969
City:  Memphis, TN
Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:  11
Color:  Violet, deep lilac and blue

Issued on the 150th anniversary of the founding of Memphis, Tennessee, this issue salutes famous composer, musician, and the man whom many consider the “inventor of the blues,” W.C. Handy.

W. C. Handy (1873-1958)
Composer and Musician

The “Father of the Blues” was born in Florence, Alabama, and later moved to Memphis, Tennessee.  Handy did not invent the blues, but was responsible for popularizing the music.  Among his famous songs are “Memphis Blues,” “Beale Street Blues,” “St. Louis Blues,” and “Joe Turner Blues.”  He wrote an autobiography, “Father of the Blues,” and a book on black musicians, “Unsung Americans Sung.”

Now you can own this stamp with rare tagging omitted.  Did you know a stamp missing its phosphorescent tagging is considered by many to be similar to a missing color error? The good news is that unlike some error stamps, untagged error stamps are affordable.

What is Phosphorescent Tagging and Why is it Important?

Tagging of U.S. stamps was introduced in 1963 with airmail stamp #C64a. It helps the U.S. Post Office use automation to move the mail at a lower cost. A virtually invisible phosphorescent material is applied either to stamp ink or paper, or to stamps after printing. This “taggant” causes each one to glow in shades of green (red on older airmails) for a moment after exposure to short-wave ultraviolet (UV) light. The afterglow makes it possible for facing-canceling machines to locate the stamp on the mail piece, and properly position it for automated cancellation and sorting.

Some stamps have been printed with and without tagging intentionally, but when tagging is omitted by accident, we collectors are treated to a scarce modern color error. Our stamp experts examined thousands of stamps to find these just for you. Now you can easily give your error collection a boost or explore this fascinating new area of collecting. Quantities are limited, so order your untagged error stamp right away.

And find more tagging omitted stamps here.