#1379 – 1969 6c Botanical Congress Franklin Tree

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Issue Date:  August 23, 1969
City:  Seattle, WA
Quantity:  159,195,000

Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:  11
Color:  Multicolored

Issued to salute the eleventh International Botanical Congress, this stamp comes from a block of four stamps, originally issued attached, that was the first set of stamps devoted to flora from each of the four corners of the United States.  They were also the first stamps to include Latin names.
 

History of the International Botanical Congress

Prior to the creation of the IBC, local botanical groups held meetings in their own areas to discuss the natural sciences.  Over time these groups grew large and many called for a large international organization.

The first meeting of the IBC was held in 1864, in Brussels, Belgium.  The meeting’s time and place were selected to coincide with an international horticultural exhibit there.  The conference was held annually for several years.  At many of these meetings, several members requested that they standardize botanical nomenclature (scientific naming of the plants).  While there was some discussion on the topic, the official rules weren’t set for several years.

Although the congresses date back to 1864, the formal numbering system  still in use today wasn’t implemented until 1900.  So the 1900 Congress is generally referred to as the First International Botanical Congress.  Since then, the meetings have generally been held about every five or six years.  During these early congresses, they adopted French as the official language of their meetings (then changed it to English in 1935) and established that Latin would be used for plant descriptions. 

Up until 1926, all of the meetings had been held in Europe.  The first one outside of Europe was held that year in Ithaca, New York.  The IBC returned to the US in 1969 for the 11th Congress in Seattle, Washington.  At that meeting they established the International Association of Bryologists (bryology is the study of mosses, liverworts, and hornworts).  For the next several decades the meetings rotated between Europe, North America, and Australia.  The first meeting in Asia occurred in 1993 in Japan.

Franklinia

Named for Benjamin Franklin, the Franklinia tree was discovered by botanists John and William Bartram. (U.S. #3314 commemorates these men) The plant was only found in a three-acre spot along Georgia’s Altamaha River. It became extinct in the wild in the early 1800s. The cultivated specimens in existence today are all descended from seeds collected by the Bartrams.

 

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Issue Date:  August 23, 1969
City:  Seattle, WA
Quantity:  159,195,000

Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:  11
Color:  Multicolored

Issued to salute the eleventh International Botanical Congress, this stamp comes from a block of four stamps, originally issued attached, that was the first set of stamps devoted to flora from each of the four corners of the United States.  They were also the first stamps to include Latin names.
 

History of the International Botanical Congress

Prior to the creation of the IBC, local botanical groups held meetings in their own areas to discuss the natural sciences.  Over time these groups grew large and many called for a large international organization.

The first meeting of the IBC was held in 1864, in Brussels, Belgium.  The meeting’s time and place were selected to coincide with an international horticultural exhibit there.  The conference was held annually for several years.  At many of these meetings, several members requested that they standardize botanical nomenclature (scientific naming of the plants).  While there was some discussion on the topic, the official rules weren’t set for several years.

Although the congresses date back to 1864, the formal numbering system  still in use today wasn’t implemented until 1900.  So the 1900 Congress is generally referred to as the First International Botanical Congress.  Since then, the meetings have generally been held about every five or six years.  During these early congresses, they adopted French as the official language of their meetings (then changed it to English in 1935) and established that Latin would be used for plant descriptions. 

Up until 1926, all of the meetings had been held in Europe.  The first one outside of Europe was held that year in Ithaca, New York.  The IBC returned to the US in 1969 for the 11th Congress in Seattle, Washington.  At that meeting they established the International Association of Bryologists (bryology is the study of mosses, liverworts, and hornworts).  For the next several decades the meetings rotated between Europe, North America, and Australia.  The first meeting in Asia occurred in 1993 in Japan.

Franklinia

Named for Benjamin Franklin, the Franklinia tree was discovered by botanists John and William Bartram. (U.S. #3314 commemorates these men) The plant was only found in a three-acre spot along Georgia’s Altamaha River. It became extinct in the wild in the early 1800s. The cultivated specimens in existence today are all descended from seeds collected by the Bartrams.