#1392 – 1970 6c Wildlife Conservation

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.50
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.15
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM50150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 30 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
- MM4202Mystic Clear Mount 45x30mm - 50 precut mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
U.S. #1392
1970 6¢ Wildlife Conservation
 
Issue Date: July 20, 1970
City: Custer, SD
Quantity: 142,205,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations: 11 x 10 ½
Color: Black
 
One of America's most familiar national symbols, the North American Bison has recovered from almost complete extinction to a population of over 350,000.
 
The American Buffalo (Bison)
The American buffalo is the largest land animal in North America. Massive herds of buffalo, more accurately known as bison, once roamed between the Appalachian Mountains and the Rocky Mountains. Many American Indian groups developed lifestyles that revolved around hunting these large animals, which can weigh up to 3,000 pounds.
 
Estimates of pre-European numbers of buffalo in America range from 30-70 million. About 20 million buffalo lived on the Western plains in 1850. White hunters began to drastically reduce the buffalo herds, and by 1889, only 551 buffalo could be found in the entire U.S. “Buffalo” Bill Cody alone killed more than 4,000 buffalo in just two years. Later, great efforts were made to help the animal recover. In 2000, the number of bison had been restored to over 350,000. Oklahoma adopted the bison as its state animal in 1972.
 
Read More - Click Here

  • U.S. Album with 100 postally used stamps, 1,000 hinges, and a free stamp collecting guide U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps 3-Volume American Heirloom Album

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Volume I, 1847-1934 Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #1392
1970 6¢ Wildlife Conservation
 
Issue Date: July 20, 1970
City: Custer, SD
Quantity: 142,205,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations: 11 x 10 ½
Color: Black
 
One of America's most familiar national symbols, the North American Bison has recovered from almost complete extinction to a population of over 350,000.
 
The American Buffalo (Bison)
The American buffalo is the largest land animal in North America. Massive herds of buffalo, more accurately known as bison, once roamed between the Appalachian Mountains and the Rocky Mountains. Many American Indian groups developed lifestyles that revolved around hunting these large animals, which can weigh up to 3,000 pounds.
 
Estimates of pre-European numbers of buffalo in America range from 30-70 million. About 20 million buffalo lived on the Western plains in 1850. White hunters began to drastically reduce the buffalo herds, and by 1889, only 551 buffalo could be found in the entire U.S. “Buffalo” Bill Cody alone killed more than 4,000 buffalo in just two years. Later, great efforts were made to help the animal recover. In 2000, the number of bison had been restored to over 350,000. Oklahoma adopted the bison as its state animal in 1972.