#1504 – 1973 8c Rural America: Angus Cattle

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U.S. #1504
8¢ Angus Cattle
Rural America Issue
 
 
Issue Date: October 5, 1973
City: St. Joseph, MO
Quantity: 145,840,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations: 11
Color: Multicolored

Issued as part of a series honoring America's rural life, this stamp marks the 100th anniversary of the arrival of Scottish Black Angus cattle to the United States.
 
Angus cattle are a breed of black, hornless beef cattle that originated in Scotland. George Grant brought four Angus bulls from Scotland and transported them to his ranch on the Kansas prairie in 1873. When two of them were exhibited at the Kansas City Livestock Expo, some farmers thought they were “freaks” because of their hornless heads. 
 
Grant crossbred the bulls with native Texas longhorn cows to produce hornless black calves that wintered well on the prairie. Others noticed the quality of Grant’s herd and began their own. Between 1878 and 1883, 1,200 more Angus were imported from Scotland.
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U.S. #1504
8¢ Angus Cattle
Rural America Issue
 
 
Issue Date: October 5, 1973
City: St. Joseph, MO
Quantity: 145,840,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations: 11
Color: Multicolored

Issued as part of a series honoring America's rural life, this stamp marks the 100th anniversary of the arrival of Scottish Black Angus cattle to the United States.
 
Angus cattle are a breed of black, hornless beef cattle that originated in Scotland. George Grant brought four Angus bulls from Scotland and transported them to his ranch on the Kansas prairie in 1873. When two of them were exhibited at the Kansas City Livestock Expo, some farmers thought they were “freaks” because of their hornless heads. 
 
Grant crossbred the bulls with native Texas longhorn cows to produce hornless black calves that wintered well on the prairie. Others noticed the quality of Grant’s herd and began their own. Between 1878 and 1883, 1,200 more Angus were imported from Scotland.