#1693 – 1976 13c Declaration of Independence: Jefferson and Franklin

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.85FREE with 150 points!
$0.85
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
2 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM50230x45mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1693
1976 13¢ Jefferson and Franklin
Declaration of Independence
 
Issue Date: July 4, 1976
City: Philadelphia, PA
Quantity: 52,008,750
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: 11
Color: Blue and multicolored
 
John Hancock's signing of the Declaration of Independence at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Hancock was the president and only member of the Continental Congress to sign the document on that date. The design reproduces a painting by John Trumbull (1756-1843).
 
The Bicentennial Series
The U.S. Bicentennial was a series of celebrations during the mid-1970s that commemorated the historic events leading to America’s independence from Great Britain. The official events began on April 1, 1975, when the American Freedom Train departed Delaware to begin a 21-month, 25,338-mile tour of the 48 contiguous states. For more than a year, a wave of patriotism swept the nation as elaborate firework displays lit up skies across the U.S., an international fleet of tall-mast sailing ships gathered in New York City and Boston, and Queen Elizabeth made a state visit. The celebration culminated on July 4, 1976, with the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. 
 
The U.S.P.S. issued 113 commemorative stamps over a six-year period in honor of the U.S. bicentennial, beginning with the American Revolution Bicentennial Commission Emblem stamp (U.S. #1432). As a group, the Bicentennial Series chronicles one of our nation’s most important chapters, and remembers the events and patriots who made the U.S. a world model for liberty.
 

Death Of Roger Sherman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roger Sherman, the only man in US history to sign America’s four most important documents; the Articles of Association, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution, died on July 23, 1793.

Sherman was born on April 19, 1721, in Newton, Massachusetts. With few educational opportunities available to him, Sherman read every spare minute – and often had a book open at his workbench in his father’s shoe repair shop.

After his father died, he moved to New Milford, Connecticut and with his brother, opened the town’s first store.  Sherman first held an official office in 1745 when he was made surveyor of New Haven County.  He was also made the town clerk of New Milford and produced a popular Almanac there each year from 1750 to 1761.

Sherman was accepted to the Bar in 1754 and elected to the General Assembly the following year.  He went on to serve as a justice of the peace and justice of the Superior Court of Connecticut.  By the time he was 40, Sherman established himself as a prominent lawyer and politician. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the Revolutionary War broke out, Sherman was made commissary to the Connecticut Troops.  He was then elected to the Continental Congress in 1774.  Sherman helped create the Articles of Association, a precursor to the Declaration of Independence which established a trade boycott with Great Britain. Well-respected among his peers for his honesty and integrity, Sherman was also selected to help create the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the Constitutional Convention, Sherman was noted for his impassioned support of a strong federal government and the rights of smaller states. With 138 speeches to the convention, Sherman was by far one its most vocal members. Fisher Ames once said that in cases of uncertainty he looked at Roger Sherman, knowing that “if I vote with him I shall vote right.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Among Sherman’s notable contributions was the inclusion “or to the people” in the 10th Amendment to the Constitution and the use of the cent in America’s financial system. Sherman died in his sleep on July 23, 1793.

 

 

 
Read More - Click Here


 

U.S. #1693
1976 13¢ Jefferson and Franklin
Declaration of Independence
 
Issue Date: July 4, 1976
City: Philadelphia, PA
Quantity: 52,008,750
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: 11
Color: Blue and multicolored
 
John Hancock's signing of the Declaration of Independence at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Hancock was the president and only member of the Continental Congress to sign the document on that date. The design reproduces a painting by John Trumbull (1756-1843).
 
The Bicentennial Series
The U.S. Bicentennial was a series of celebrations during the mid-1970s that commemorated the historic events leading to America’s independence from Great Britain. The official events began on April 1, 1975, when the American Freedom Train departed Delaware to begin a 21-month, 25,338-mile tour of the 48 contiguous states. For more than a year, a wave of patriotism swept the nation as elaborate firework displays lit up skies across the U.S., an international fleet of tall-mast sailing ships gathered in New York City and Boston, and Queen Elizabeth made a state visit. The celebration culminated on July 4, 1976, with the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. 
 
The U.S.P.S. issued 113 commemorative stamps over a six-year period in honor of the U.S. bicentennial, beginning with the American Revolution Bicentennial Commission Emblem stamp (U.S. #1432). As a group, the Bicentennial Series chronicles one of our nation’s most important chapters, and remembers the events and patriots who made the U.S. a world model for liberty.
 

Death Of Roger Sherman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roger Sherman, the only man in US history to sign America’s four most important documents; the Articles of Association, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution, died on July 23, 1793.

Sherman was born on April 19, 1721, in Newton, Massachusetts. With few educational opportunities available to him, Sherman read every spare minute – and often had a book open at his workbench in his father’s shoe repair shop.

After his father died, he moved to New Milford, Connecticut and with his brother, opened the town’s first store.  Sherman first held an official office in 1745 when he was made surveyor of New Haven County.  He was also made the town clerk of New Milford and produced a popular Almanac there each year from 1750 to 1761.

Sherman was accepted to the Bar in 1754 and elected to the General Assembly the following year.  He went on to serve as a justice of the peace and justice of the Superior Court of Connecticut.  By the time he was 40, Sherman established himself as a prominent lawyer and politician. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the Revolutionary War broke out, Sherman was made commissary to the Connecticut Troops.  He was then elected to the Continental Congress in 1774.  Sherman helped create the Articles of Association, a precursor to the Declaration of Independence which established a trade boycott with Great Britain. Well-respected among his peers for his honesty and integrity, Sherman was also selected to help create the Declaration of Independence and the Articles of Confederation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the Constitutional Convention, Sherman was noted for his impassioned support of a strong federal government and the rights of smaller states. With 138 speeches to the convention, Sherman was by far one its most vocal members. Fisher Ames once said that in cases of uncertainty he looked at Roger Sherman, knowing that “if I vote with him I shall vote right.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Among Sherman’s notable contributions was the inclusion “or to the people” in the 10th Amendment to the Constitution and the use of the cent in America’s financial system. Sherman died in his sleep on July 23, 1793.