#1757b – 1978 13c Wildlife from Canadian/US Border - Mallard

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U.S. #1757b
1978 13¢ CAPEX Wildlife

Issue Date: June 10, 1978
City: Toronto, Canada
Quantity: 15,170,400
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Issued in conjunction with the 1978 Canadian Philatelic Exhibition in Toronto, the CAPEX souvenir sheet was the first U.S. souvenir sheet to be released outside the country. Eight different stamps, featuring popular animals and birds from North America, appear together on this colorful sheet.
 
The mallard is one of the most common of wild ducks. The male, which is known for its striking plumage of greens, purples, and rust, loses most of its brightly-colored feathers after breeding season. During the winter months, the mallard, which nests in prairie marshes and ponds in the spring, migrates to southern wetlands.
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U.S. #1757b
1978 13¢ CAPEX Wildlife

Issue Date: June 10, 1978
City: Toronto, Canada
Quantity: 15,170,400
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Issued in conjunction with the 1978 Canadian Philatelic Exhibition in Toronto, the CAPEX souvenir sheet was the first U.S. souvenir sheet to be released outside the country. Eight different stamps, featuring popular animals and birds from North America, appear together on this colorful sheet.
 
The mallard is one of the most common of wild ducks. The male, which is known for its striking plumage of greens, purples, and rust, loses most of its brightly-colored feathers after breeding season. During the winter months, the mallard, which nests in prairie marshes and ponds in the spring, migrates to southern wetlands.