#17//291 – 1851-98 Classic U.S. Stamps, set of 7

Condition
Price
Qty
- Used Stamp(s) (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1,125.00
$1,125.00
 

Save on Classic U.S. Stamps –
All Over 100 Years Old

Now you can get seven old US stamps and save!  This set comes with a big price reduction thanks to Mystic’s tough grading standards.  We found one or two tiny imperfections in each of these used stamps.  That means you can own them for a large percentage off Mystic’s US Stamp Catalog prices.  Their minor flaws don’t detract from the stamps’ beauty or collectibility, but do allow this nice discount.

The set includes…

U.S. #17 – 12¢ Black Imperforate Washington – The highest value of the 1851-57 Imperforate Series was most often used in pairs to pay the 24¢ rate to the United Kingdom.  Until the practice was prohibited, the stamp was sometimes bisected (cut in half) to pay the 6¢ rate.  Margins are usually small due to tight spacing on the printing plate.  A reproduction of this stamp appears on the “Classics Forever” set issued for the World Stamp Show-NY 2016. 

U.S. #70 – 24¢ Red Lilac Washington – In 1861 and 1862, the US Post Office issued several 24¢ Washington stamps in a number of different shades and colors that have been assigned major Scott Catalog numbers.  The red lilac 24¢ Washington (#70) is considered the scarcest of all the 1861 issues of this denomination after the true violet.  Only about 400,000 of these stamps were printed, many of which were likely used and discarded.

U.S. #72 – 90¢ Blue Washington – highest denomination of the 1861-62 Series, which replaced all previously issued US stamps.  After the Civil War began, all earlier stamps were demonetized (declared invalid for postage), forcing the South to establish its own postal system and print its own stamps.  This stamp took the place of US #39. 

U.S. #97 – 12¢ Black Washington “F” Grill.  The Series of 1867 was the second to be embossed (grilled) to deter the re-use of US postage stamps.  Embossing broke the paper fibers, allowing cancellation ink to soak deeply into the paper.  Grills made it almost impossible to remove cancellation ink without shredding the stamp.  Distinguished from #90 “E” Grill of the same series by the size of its grill:  the “F” Grill has 11-12 x 15-17 points measuring about 9 x 13 mm, while the “E” Grill has 14 x 15-17 points measuring about 11 x 13. 

U.S. #115 – 6¢ Ultramarine Washington Pictorial with “G” Grill.  Withdrawn from sale with the rest of the series less than a year after issue – it’s one of the shortest-lived definitives in US history.  The #115’s intended denomination was 5¢, but it was increased when the postage to Canada dropped from 10¢ to 6¢.  It fulfilled that rate, plus the domestic double weight letter rate for 1/2 to 1 ounce and postage to England.  The Pictorial Series is often considered the forerunner of US commemoratives. 

U.S. #240 – 50¢ Slate Blue Columbian Recall of Columbus.  Only 243,750 issued!  This stamp is the first US postage stamp to have a 50¢ denomination.  Marking the transition to the higher-value Columbians, it was used for international and heavy domestic mail.  The Columbians were America’s first commemorative stamps are a milestone in stamp history. 

U.S. #291 – 50¢ Sage Green Trans-Mississippi Western Mining Prospector.  Stamps tell the history of America.  There’s no better example than the Trans-Mississippi Series illustrating the story of our westward expansion.  The 50¢ variety illustrates the Gold Rush, which inspired many adventurous souls to seek their fortune in the Old West.  And it was Frederic Remington’s drawing The Gold Bug which inspired the design on this scarce old stamp. 

Collecting stamps is all about documenting the history they made and the history they honor.  America’s discovery, our westward march across the continent, our war to unite the country and abolish slavery.  This set is your opportunity to own these important stamps and save!

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Save on Classic U.S. Stamps –
All Over 100 Years Old

Now you can get seven old US stamps and save!  This set comes with a big price reduction thanks to Mystic’s tough grading standards.  We found one or two tiny imperfections in each of these used stamps.  That means you can own them for a large percentage off Mystic’s US Stamp Catalog prices.  Their minor flaws don’t detract from the stamps’ beauty or collectibility, but do allow this nice discount.

The set includes…

U.S. #17 – 12¢ Black Imperforate Washington – The highest value of the 1851-57 Imperforate Series was most often used in pairs to pay the 24¢ rate to the United Kingdom.  Until the practice was prohibited, the stamp was sometimes bisected (cut in half) to pay the 6¢ rate.  Margins are usually small due to tight spacing on the printing plate.  A reproduction of this stamp appears on the “Classics Forever” set issued for the World Stamp Show-NY 2016. 

U.S. #70 – 24¢ Red Lilac Washington – In 1861 and 1862, the US Post Office issued several 24¢ Washington stamps in a number of different shades and colors that have been assigned major Scott Catalog numbers.  The red lilac 24¢ Washington (#70) is considered the scarcest of all the 1861 issues of this denomination after the true violet.  Only about 400,000 of these stamps were printed, many of which were likely used and discarded.

U.S. #72 – 90¢ Blue Washington – highest denomination of the 1861-62 Series, which replaced all previously issued US stamps.  After the Civil War began, all earlier stamps were demonetized (declared invalid for postage), forcing the South to establish its own postal system and print its own stamps.  This stamp took the place of US #39. 

U.S. #97 – 12¢ Black Washington “F” Grill.  The Series of 1867 was the second to be embossed (grilled) to deter the re-use of US postage stamps.  Embossing broke the paper fibers, allowing cancellation ink to soak deeply into the paper.  Grills made it almost impossible to remove cancellation ink without shredding the stamp.  Distinguished from #90 “E” Grill of the same series by the size of its grill:  the “F” Grill has 11-12 x 15-17 points measuring about 9 x 13 mm, while the “E” Grill has 14 x 15-17 points measuring about 11 x 13. 

U.S. #115 – 6¢ Ultramarine Washington Pictorial with “G” Grill.  Withdrawn from sale with the rest of the series less than a year after issue – it’s one of the shortest-lived definitives in US history.  The #115’s intended denomination was 5¢, but it was increased when the postage to Canada dropped from 10¢ to 6¢.  It fulfilled that rate, plus the domestic double weight letter rate for 1/2 to 1 ounce and postage to England.  The Pictorial Series is often considered the forerunner of US commemoratives. 

U.S. #240 – 50¢ Slate Blue Columbian Recall of Columbus.  Only 243,750 issued!  This stamp is the first US postage stamp to have a 50¢ denomination.  Marking the transition to the higher-value Columbians, it was used for international and heavy domestic mail.  The Columbians were America’s first commemorative stamps are a milestone in stamp history. 

U.S. #291 – 50¢ Sage Green Trans-Mississippi Western Mining Prospector.  Stamps tell the history of America.  There’s no better example than the Trans-Mississippi Series illustrating the story of our westward expansion.  The 50¢ variety illustrates the Gold Rush, which inspired many adventurous souls to seek their fortune in the Old West.  And it was Frederic Remington’s drawing The Gold Bug which inspired the design on this scarce old stamp. 

Collecting stamps is all about documenting the history they made and the history they honor.  America’s discovery, our westward march across the continent, our war to unite the country and abolish slavery.  This set is your opportunity to own these important stamps and save!