#1848 – 1983 5c Great Americans: Pearl Buck

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.50FREE with 100 points!
$0.50
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50327x30mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420027x30mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1848
1983 5¢ Pearl Buck
Great Americans Series
   
Issue Date: June 25, 1983
City: Hillsboro, West Virginia
Quantity: 150,000,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations: 11 x 10 ½
Color: Henna brown
   

Birth of Pearl S. Buck

1983 Pearl Buck stamp
US #1848 was issued the day before Buck’s 91st birthday.

Author Pearl Sydenstricker Buck was born on June 26, 1892, in Hillsboro, West Virginia.  She was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1932, the Nobel Prize in 1938, and was the only woman at that time to receive both honors.

Buck’s parents had lived in China prior to her birth, but returned to the US so she could be born there.  When she was five months old, they went back to China.  Buck grew up in Huai-an, Zhenjuang, and Shanghai.  She learned English, classical Chinese, and the local Chinese dialect.  Buck loved to read and would later read all of Charles Dickens’s novels every year.

1961 Republic of China stamp
US #1188 – Many of Buck’s stories involved China and she wrote a book about Sun Yat-Sen in 1953.

Buck returned to the US in 1911 to attend Randolph-Macon Woman’s College in Virginia.  While she didn’t initially intend to return to China, when she received word that her mother was ill, she applied to become a Presbyterian missionary, serving from 1914 to 1932.

Pearl married John Lossing Buck in 1917 and taught English literature at a few Chinese colleges and universities.  She and her husband returned to the US in 1924 for a year, during which time she earned her master’s degree from Cornell University.  After returning to China, her family was displaced during the Nanking Incident of March, 1927.  They spent a day in hiding before fleeing to Japan for most of the remainder of the year.

2000 Adoption stamp
US #3398 – Buck adopted a daughter in 1925 and committed much of her humanitarian efforts to adoption and orphan organizations.

Once she returned to China in late 1927, Buck decided to become a professional writer to support herself and care for her sick daughter.  Three years later, she published her first novel, East Wind: West Wind.  She followed that a year later with The Good Earth.  The Good Earth was the best-selling fiction novel in the US in 1931 and earned Buck the Pulitzer Prize in 1932.

On a later trip back to the US, Buck gave a speech at a Presbyterian women’s luncheon that shared her belief that missionaries to China were unnecessary.  When her address was published in Harper’s Magazine, she came under heated criticism and resigned her position with the Presbyterian Board.

Buck moved back to the US permanently in 1934, and was prohibited from returning to China following the Communist Revolution.  In 1938 she became the first American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, “for her rich and truly epic descriptions of peasant life in China and for her biographical masterpieces.”

1983 Buck Colorano Silk Cachet First Day Cover
US #1848 – Colorano Silk Cachet First Day Cover

Buck continued to write novels and short stories for the rest of her life.  Many of her works explored women’s rights, Asian culture, immigration, adoption, missionary work, war, and violence.  She aided a relief campaign for victims of the 1931 China floods.  In 1949, Buck helped co-found Welcome House Inc. which was the first international, interracial adoption agency.  Then in 1964, she founded the Pearl S. Buck Foundation to provide aid to children who weren’t eligible for adoption.  Buck also opened orphanages in South Korea, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam.

1983 Buck Fleetwood First Day Cover
US #1848 – Fleetwood First Day Cover

Buck died of lung cancer on March 6, 1973.  Buck’s birthplace was later made into a historic house and cultural center on the National Register of Historic Places.  Her former home at Nanjing University was designated a memorial house.

1983 Buck Classic First Day Cover
US #1848 – Classic First Day Cover
 
The Great Americans Series
The popular Great Americans Series honors special Americans from all walks of life and honors them for their contributions to society and their fellow man. Sixty-four different stamps make up the complete set to pay tribute to important individuals who were leaders in education, the military, literature, the arts, and human and civil rights.
 
 
Read More - Click Here


  • Latvia Map Stamps - Imperforate block of 16 with map on reverse, one imperforate single plus FREE album page and mounts Latvia Map Stamps

    Own rare World War I stamp artifacts most collectors have never even seen.  The first stamps of Latvia – printed on German military maps over 100 years ago. Order yours today!

    $36.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Baseball, Artcraft First Day Portraits, Set of 5 Legends of Baseball First Day Cover Set
    This set includes five special-edition First Day Covers featuring the 2000 Legends of Baseball US stamps. Each cover was canceled on the stamps' first day of issue and includes a large vintage photograph of the baseball player pictured on the stamp. Order yours today!
    $29.95
    BUY NOW
  • Legends of Hollywood Full Pane Cover Mix - selections may vary Legends of Hollywood Full Pan Cover Mix
    These panes are really neat – they feature additional images of each star plus a brief biography.  These full pane covers were produced in small numbers. Selections vary – let us choose five covers to add to your collection today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1848
1983 5¢ Pearl Buck
Great Americans Series

 

 

Issue Date: June 25, 1983
City: Hillsboro, West Virginia
Quantity: 150,000,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations: 11 x 10 ½
Color: Henna brown

 

 

Birth of Pearl S. Buck

1983 Pearl Buck stamp
US #1848 was issued the day before Buck’s 91st birthday.

Author Pearl Sydenstricker Buck was born on June 26, 1892, in Hillsboro, West Virginia.  She was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1932, the Nobel Prize in 1938, and was the only woman at that time to receive both honors.

Buck’s parents had lived in China prior to her birth, but returned to the US so she could be born there.  When she was five months old, they went back to China.  Buck grew up in Huai-an, Zhenjuang, and Shanghai.  She learned English, classical Chinese, and the local Chinese dialect.  Buck loved to read and would later read all of Charles Dickens’s novels every year.

1961 Republic of China stamp
US #1188 – Many of Buck’s stories involved China and she wrote a book about Sun Yat-Sen in 1953.

Buck returned to the US in 1911 to attend Randolph-Macon Woman’s College in Virginia.  While she didn’t initially intend to return to China, when she received word that her mother was ill, she applied to become a Presbyterian missionary, serving from 1914 to 1932.

Pearl married John Lossing Buck in 1917 and taught English literature at a few Chinese colleges and universities.  She and her husband returned to the US in 1924 for a year, during which time she earned her master’s degree from Cornell University.  After returning to China, her family was displaced during the Nanking Incident of March, 1927.  They spent a day in hiding before fleeing to Japan for most of the remainder of the year.

2000 Adoption stamp
US #3398 – Buck adopted a daughter in 1925 and committed much of her humanitarian efforts to adoption and orphan organizations.

Once she returned to China in late 1927, Buck decided to become a professional writer to support herself and care for her sick daughter.  Three years later, she published her first novel, East Wind: West Wind.  She followed that a year later with The Good Earth.  The Good Earth was the best-selling fiction novel in the US in 1931 and earned Buck the Pulitzer Prize in 1932.

On a later trip back to the US, Buck gave a speech at a Presbyterian women’s luncheon that shared her belief that missionaries to China were unnecessary.  When her address was published in Harper’s Magazine, she came under heated criticism and resigned her position with the Presbyterian Board.

Buck moved back to the US permanently in 1934, and was prohibited from returning to China following the Communist Revolution.  In 1938 she became the first American woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, “for her rich and truly epic descriptions of peasant life in China and for her biographical masterpieces.”

1983 Buck Colorano Silk Cachet First Day Cover
US #1848 – Colorano Silk Cachet First Day Cover

Buck continued to write novels and short stories for the rest of her life.  Many of her works explored women’s rights, Asian culture, immigration, adoption, missionary work, war, and violence.  She aided a relief campaign for victims of the 1931 China floods.  In 1949, Buck helped co-found Welcome House Inc. which was the first international, interracial adoption agency.  Then in 1964, she founded the Pearl S. Buck Foundation to provide aid to children who weren’t eligible for adoption.  Buck also opened orphanages in South Korea, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam.

1983 Buck Fleetwood First Day Cover
US #1848 – Fleetwood First Day Cover

Buck died of lung cancer on March 6, 1973.  Buck’s birthplace was later made into a historic house and cultural center on the National Register of Historic Places.  Her former home at Nanjing University was designated a memorial house.

1983 Buck Classic First Day Cover
US #1848 – Classic First Day Cover
 
The Great Americans Series
The popular Great Americans Series honors special Americans from all walks of life and honors them for their contributions to society and their fellow man. Sixty-four different stamps make up the complete set to pay tribute to important individuals who were leaders in education, the military, literature, the arts, and human and civil rights.