#1858 – 1981 18c George Mason

U.S. #1858
18¢ George Mason
Great Americans Series
 
Issue Date: May 7, 1981
City: Gunston Hall, VA
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Engraved
Perforations:
11
Color: Dark blue
 
U.S. #1858 is the 18¢ stamp of the Great Americans Series. It honors George Mason, one of the nation’s Founding Fathers.
 
The Great Americans Series
The popular Great Americans Series honors special Americans from all walks of life and honors them for their contributions to society and their fellow man. Sixty-four different stamps make up the complete set to pay tribute to important individuals who were leaders in education, the military, literature, the arts, and human and civil rights.
 
George Mason (1725-92)
American Patriot
As the author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights, George Mason is credited with providing the framework for the U.S. Bill of Rights. Although he served as the Virginia delegate to the Constitutional Convention, he refused to sign the finished document, because “...there is no Declaration of Rights, and the laws of the general government being paramount to the laws and constitution of the several states, the Declaration of Rights in the separate states are no security.”
 
Following his retirement from politics, Mason continued to give advice from his home. Thomas Jefferson said of Mason, “Whenever I pass your road, I shall do myself the favor of turning into it.” Unfortunately, Mason’s friendship with George Washington did not withstand the volatile issues facing the Continental Congress. Washington referred to Mason as a “quondum (former) friend,” and the neighbors seldom spoke in later years.
 
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U.S. #1858
18¢ George Mason
Great Americans Series
 
Issue Date: May 7, 1981
City: Gunston Hall, VA
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Engraved
Perforations:
11
Color: Dark blue
 
U.S. #1858 is the 18¢ stamp of the Great Americans Series. It honors George Mason, one of the nation’s Founding Fathers.
 
The Great Americans Series
The popular Great Americans Series honors special Americans from all walks of life and honors them for their contributions to society and their fellow man. Sixty-four different stamps make up the complete set to pay tribute to important individuals who were leaders in education, the military, literature, the arts, and human and civil rights.
 
George Mason (1725-92)
American Patriot
As the author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights, George Mason is credited with providing the framework for the U.S. Bill of Rights. Although he served as the Virginia delegate to the Constitutional Convention, he refused to sign the finished document, because “...there is no Declaration of Rights, and the laws of the general government being paramount to the laws and constitution of the several states, the Declaration of Rights in the separate states are no security.”
 
Following his retirement from politics, Mason continued to give advice from his home. Thomas Jefferson said of Mason, “Whenever I pass your road, I shall do myself the favor of turning into it.” Unfortunately, Mason’s friendship with George Washington did not withstand the volatile issues facing the Continental Congress. Washington referred to Mason as a “quondum (former) friend,” and the neighbors seldom spoke in later years.