#2052 – 1983 20c Signing of Treaty of Paris

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U.S. #2052
20¢ Signing of Treaty of Paris
 
Issue Date: September 2, 1983
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 104,340,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations
: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
This stamp recalls the Treaty of Paris, which proclaimed that the U.S. was an independent nation, free of British rule. The treaty formally ended the Revolutionary War.
 
Treaty of Paris
The Treaty of Paris, 1783, ended the American Revolution and recognized the independence of the American colonies. This historic document was signed in the Maryland Statehouse. The Maryland Statehouse was also the meeting site of the Congress of the Confederation. George Washington resigned his commission from the Continental Army there, as well.
 
Peace discussions between the Americans and the British opened in Paris in April 1782. Richard Oswell, a wealthy merchant, represented the British. Three statesmen represented the American colonies – Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and John Jay.
 
A preliminary peace treaty was signed November 30, 1782. Congress approved the treaty on April 15, 1783. It was signed at the Maryland State House on September 3, 1783.
 
 
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U.S. #2052
20¢ Signing of Treaty of Paris
 
Issue Date: September 2, 1983
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 104,340,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations
: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
This stamp recalls the Treaty of Paris, which proclaimed that the U.S. was an independent nation, free of British rule. The treaty formally ended the Revolutionary War.
 
Treaty of Paris
The Treaty of Paris, 1783, ended the American Revolution and recognized the independence of the American colonies. This historic document was signed in the Maryland Statehouse. The Maryland Statehouse was also the meeting site of the Congress of the Confederation. George Washington resigned his commission from the Continental Army there, as well.
 
Peace discussions between the Americans and the British opened in Paris in April 1782. Richard Oswell, a wealthy merchant, represented the British. Three statesmen represented the American colonies – Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and John Jay.
 
A preliminary peace treaty was signed November 30, 1782. Congress approved the treaty on April 15, 1783. It was signed at the Maryland State House on September 3, 1783.