#217 – 1888 30c Hamilton, orange brown

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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$350.00
- Used Single Stamp(s)
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$115.00
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
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$215.00
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
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$80.00
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- MM638215x33mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
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$7.95
$7.95
- MM216829x33mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
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$3.50
$3.50
- MM420129x33mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
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$3.50
$3.50
U.S. # 217
Series of 1888 30¢ Hamilton

Issue Date: January, 1888
Quantity issued:
 710,720
Printed by: American Bank Note Company
Method: Flat plate
Watermark: None
Perforation: 12
Color: Orange brown
 
In 1887 and 1888, some stamps of the 1870-89 regular issues were produced in new colors, and the 1¢ denomination was redesigned. On August 15, 1887, an official postal circular announced these color changes. In addition to stating that the 2¢ red brown issue would be printed in green and the 3¢ green would be vermilion, the circular also announced changes in the designs and colors of certain stamped envelopes.
 
Less than a month later, the two stamps were issued in their new colors, and the stamped envelopes were also printed in new colors; the 4¢ changed to carmine, the 5¢ to indigo, the 30¢ to orange-brown, and the 90¢ to purple. Interestingly, during the next year, the 4¢, 5¢, 30¢, and 90¢ stamps began appearing in colors corresponding to those that had been adopted for the envelopes of the same values. Although philatelic journals of the day chronicled the changes, there were no official postal circulars announcing the color differences of the 4¢, 5¢, 30¢, and 90¢ issues.
 
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U.S. # 217
Series of 1888 30¢ Hamilton

Issue Date: January, 1888
Quantity issued:
 710,720
Printed by: American Bank Note Company
Method: Flat plate
Watermark: None
Perforation: 12
Color: Orange brown
 
In 1887 and 1888, some stamps of the 1870-89 regular issues were produced in new colors, and the 1¢ denomination was redesigned. On August 15, 1887, an official postal circular announced these color changes. In addition to stating that the 2¢ red brown issue would be printed in green and the 3¢ green would be vermilion, the circular also announced changes in the designs and colors of certain stamped envelopes.
 
Less than a month later, the two stamps were issued in their new colors, and the stamped envelopes were also printed in new colors; the 4¢ changed to carmine, the 5¢ to indigo, the 30¢ to orange-brown, and the 90¢ to purple. Interestingly, during the next year, the 4¢, 5¢, 30¢, and 90¢ stamps began appearing in colors corresponding to those that had been adopted for the envelopes of the same values. Although philatelic journals of the day chronicled the changes, there were no official postal circulars announcing the color differences of the 4¢, 5¢, 30¢, and 90¢ issues.