#218 – 1888 90c Perry, purple

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1,000.00
$1,000.00
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$275.00
$275.00
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$575.00
$575.00
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$159.00
$159.00
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Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63825 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 33 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-5/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
$7.50
- MM216850 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 29 x 33 millimeters (1-1/8 x 1-5/16 inches)
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$2.95
$2.95
- MM4201Mystic Clear Mount 29x33mm - 50 precut mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
$1.95
U.S. # 218
Series of 1888 90¢ Perry

Issue Date: February 1888
Quantity issued:
103,130
Printed by: American Bank Note Company
Method: Flat plate
Watermark: None
Perforation: 12
Color: Purple
 
In 1887 and 1888, some stamps of the 1870-89 regular issues were produced in new colors, and the 1¢ denomination was redesigned. On August 15, 1887, an official postal circular announced these color changes. In addition to stating that the 2¢ red brown issue would be printed in green and the 3¢ green would be vermilion, the circular also announced changes in the designs and colors of certain stamped envelopes.
 
Less than a month later, the two stamps were issued in their new colors, and the stamped envelopes were also printed in new colors; the 4¢ changed to carmine, the 5¢ to indigo, the 30¢ to orange-brown, and the 90¢ to purple. Interestingly, during the next year, the 4¢, 5¢, 30¢, and 90¢ stamps began appearing in colors corresponding to those that had been adopted for the envelopes of the same values. Although philatelic journals of the day chronicled the changes, there were no official postal circulars announcing the color differences of the 4¢, 5¢, 30¢, and 90¢ issues.
 
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U.S. # 218
Series of 1888 90¢ Perry

Issue Date: February 1888
Quantity issued:
103,130
Printed by: American Bank Note Company
Method: Flat plate
Watermark: None
Perforation: 12
Color: Purple
 
In 1887 and 1888, some stamps of the 1870-89 regular issues were produced in new colors, and the 1¢ denomination was redesigned. On August 15, 1887, an official postal circular announced these color changes. In addition to stating that the 2¢ red brown issue would be printed in green and the 3¢ green would be vermilion, the circular also announced changes in the designs and colors of certain stamped envelopes.
 
Less than a month later, the two stamps were issued in their new colors, and the stamped envelopes were also printed in new colors; the 4¢ changed to carmine, the 5¢ to indigo, the 30¢ to orange-brown, and the 90¢ to purple. Interestingly, during the next year, the 4¢, 5¢, 30¢, and 90¢ stamps began appearing in colors corresponding to those that had been adopted for the envelopes of the same values. Although philatelic journals of the day chronicled the changes, there were no official postal circulars announcing the color differences of the 4¢, 5¢, 30¢, and 90¢ issues.