#2259 – 1988 13.2c Transportation Series: Coal Car, 1870s

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U.S. #2259
13.2¢ Coal Car
Transportation Series Coil

Issue Date: July 19, 1988
City: Pittsburgh, PA
Quantity: 425,011,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations:
10 vertically
Color: Slate green
 
Until the mid-19th century, coal was hauled to the surface by mules or by the miners themselves - making mining a slow and dangerous process. With the development of the locomotive, coal was soon being carried by a variation of the railroad car - the coal mining car. Today, continued improvements add to the safety and efficiency of mining.
 
The Transportation Series
A ground-breaking stamp was quietly issued on May 18, 1981. For the first time in U.S. history, a coil stamp featured its own unique design rather than simply copying that of the current definitive stamp. Fifty more coil stamps would be issued over the course of the next 15 years, each picturing a different mode of transportation. 
 
The various denominations provided face values to exactly match the rates for several categories of Third Class mail (bulk rate and quanity-discounted mail). As the rates changed, new stamps with new values were added. Never before had a stamp series included so many fractional cent values.
 
Most of the stamps in the Transportation Series were printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, although a few were printed by private contractors. All but a few of the later stamps were produced by engraved intaglio. Differences in precancels, tagging, paper and gum provide a large number of varieties.
 
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U.S. #2259
13.2¢ Coal Car
Transportation Series Coil

Issue Date: July 19, 1988
City: Pittsburgh, PA
Quantity: 425,011,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Engraved
Perforations:
10 vertically
Color: Slate green
 
Until the mid-19th century, coal was hauled to the surface by mules or by the miners themselves - making mining a slow and dangerous process. With the development of the locomotive, coal was soon being carried by a variation of the railroad car - the coal mining car. Today, continued improvements add to the safety and efficiency of mining.
 
The Transportation Series
A ground-breaking stamp was quietly issued on May 18, 1981. For the first time in U.S. history, a coil stamp featured its own unique design rather than simply copying that of the current definitive stamp. Fifty more coil stamps would be issued over the course of the next 15 years, each picturing a different mode of transportation. 
 
The various denominations provided face values to exactly match the rates for several categories of Third Class mail (bulk rate and quanity-discounted mail). As the rates changed, new stamps with new values were added. Never before had a stamp series included so many fractional cent values.
 
Most of the stamps in the Transportation Series were printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, although a few were printed by private contractors. All but a few of the later stamps were produced by engraved intaglio. Differences in precancels, tagging, paper and gum provide a large number of varieties.