#2838j – 1994 29c WWII, Bastogne, Battle of Bulge

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U.S. #2838j
1994 29¢ Battle of the Bulge
World War II – 1944: Road to Victory

Issue Date: June 6, 1994
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 6,030,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
10.9
Color: Multicolored

On July 25, 1944, Allied troops broke through German lines at St. Lo and a month later Paris was liberated after four long years of Nazi occupation. Driving forward, Patton pushed eastward toward the Rhine River, while Montgomery swept into Belgium, capturing Antwerp on September 4th. By the late fall U.S. and British forces had managed to drive the Germans back to their own borders.
 
Faced with disaster, Hitler made one final attempt to win the war. Pulling together his failing resources, he planned to break through the weakly-held front of Belgium’s Ardennes Forest, severing the Allied forces in two. On December 16th, German forces launched their attack. Taken by surprise, the Allies retreated for eight days before they managed to regroup and push the Germans back.
 
The Battle of the Bulge, as it came to be known because of the initial dent made in the front line, changed the Allies’ position very little. By January 16, 1945, the Ardennes front had been re-established where it had been a month earlier. Hitler however, suffered heavy losses of both men and supplies. Although there were many weeks of fighting ahead, the last hundred days of the “thousand year” Third Reich had begun.
 
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U.S. #2838j
1994 29¢ Battle of the Bulge
World War II – 1944: Road to Victory

Issue Date: June 6, 1994
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 6,030,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
10.9
Color: Multicolored

On July 25, 1944, Allied troops broke through German lines at St. Lo and a month later Paris was liberated after four long years of Nazi occupation. Driving forward, Patton pushed eastward toward the Rhine River, while Montgomery swept into Belgium, capturing Antwerp on September 4th. By the late fall U.S. and British forces had managed to drive the Germans back to their own borders.
 
Faced with disaster, Hitler made one final attempt to win the war. Pulling together his failing resources, he planned to break through the weakly-held front of Belgium’s Ardennes Forest, severing the Allied forces in two. On December 16th, German forces launched their attack. Taken by surprise, the Allies retreated for eight days before they managed to regroup and push the Germans back.
 
The Battle of the Bulge, as it came to be known because of the initial dent made in the front line, changed the Allies’ position very little. By January 16, 1945, the Ardennes front had been re-established where it had been a month earlier. Hitler however, suffered heavy losses of both men and supplies. Although there were many weeks of fighting ahead, the last hundred days of the “thousand year” Third Reich had begun.