#2840 – 1994 50c Norman Rockwell, souvenir sheet

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U.S. #2840
1994 Norman Rockwell (Souvenir Sheet of 4)

 
  • Issued for the 100th birth anniversary of Norman Rockwell (along with a single stamp)
  • Pictures Rowell’s iconic The Four Freedoms paintings
     
Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Value:  50¢
First Day of Issue:  July 1, 1994
First Day City:  Stockbridge, Massachusetts
Quantity Issued (if known):  80,000,000 panes
Printed by:  Printed forAshton-Potter (USA) by Manhardt-Alexander, Inc.
Printing Method:  Offset (Heidelberg Speedmasteroffset 6-color sheetfed press)
Format:  Souvenir Panes of 4 (Vertical 2 across, 2 down)
Perforations:  10.9 x 11.1 (reciprocating stroke perforator)
Tagging:  One large block covering all four stamps but not selvage.  When removed from pane, single stamps may appear to be overall tagged.

Why the stamp was issued:  To honor one of the greatest American artists of all time – Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) – on the 100th anniversary of his birth.

About the stamp design:  Each stamp pictures one of Rockwell’s Four Freedoms paintings:  Freedom From WantFreedom From FearFreedom of Speech, and Freedom of Worship.  Each stamp includes a concealed

Special design details:  Each stamp includes a concealed “1994” in its design: in Freedom From Want just above the turkey’s wing, in Freedom From Fear just above the blanket on the bedpost on the far right, in Freedom of Speechabove the partial hand in the middle of the bottom-left shoulder of the man in the gray sweater, and in Freedom of Worship in front of the eyebrow of the dark-haired man at the upper left.

First Day City:  This stamp, along with the four-stamp Norman Rockwell souvenir sheet, was issued in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, at the Norman Rockwell Museum.

History the stamps represent:  In 1942, Norman Rockwell began a series of four paintings that pictured ordinary Americans in scenes portraying the ideals for which the United States had gone to war.  Called “The Four Freedoms,” the series included Freedom from WantFreedom from FearFreedom of Speech, and Freedom of Worship.

Unlike much of his other work, these paintings were not designed as illustrations, but rather as original works of art.  More than one million people saw the original paintings in a 16-city tour on behalf of war bonds.  So successful was the tour that over $130 million was raised for the cause.  Publishing the paintings as inside illustrations, The Saturday Evening Post generated an equally impressive response from its readers.  Government agencies that had turned down the series when Rockwell offered it to them soon realized their error, for these powerful images struck a chord that reverberated around the country.

Despite a devastating studio fire in 1943 in which he lost many irreplaceable paintings and sketches, as well as his entire collection of books, antique costumes, and props, Rockwell continued his war effort.  His most memorable covers from the war years include Rosie the RiveterHome for Thanksgiving, and Homecoming G.I.
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U.S. #2840
1994 Norman Rockwell (Souvenir Sheet of 4)

 

  • Issued for the 100th birth anniversary of Norman Rockwell (along with a single stamp)
  • Pictures Rowell’s iconic The Four Freedoms paintings
     

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Value:  50¢
First Day of Issue:  July 1, 1994
First Day City:  Stockbridge, Massachusetts
Quantity Issued (if known):  80,000,000 panes
Printed by:  Printed forAshton-Potter (USA) by Manhardt-Alexander, Inc.
Printing Method:  Offset (Heidelberg Speedmasteroffset 6-color sheetfed press)
Format:  Souvenir Panes of 4 (Vertical 2 across, 2 down)
Perforations:  10.9 x 11.1 (reciprocating stroke perforator)
Tagging:  One large block covering all four stamps but not selvage.  When removed from pane, single stamps may appear to be overall tagged.

Why the stamp was issued:  To honor one of the greatest American artists of all time – Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) – on the 100th anniversary of his birth.

About the stamp design:  Each stamp pictures one of Rockwell’s Four Freedoms paintings:  Freedom From WantFreedom From FearFreedom of Speech, and Freedom of Worship.  Each stamp includes a concealed

Special design details:  Each stamp includes a concealed “1994” in its design: in Freedom From Want just above the turkey’s wing, in Freedom From Fear just above the blanket on the bedpost on the far right, in Freedom of Speechabove the partial hand in the middle of the bottom-left shoulder of the man in the gray sweater, and in Freedom of Worship in front of the eyebrow of the dark-haired man at the upper left.

First Day City:  This stamp, along with the four-stamp Norman Rockwell souvenir sheet, was issued in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, at the Norman Rockwell Museum.

History the stamps represent:  In 1942, Norman Rockwell began a series of four paintings that pictured ordinary Americans in scenes portraying the ideals for which the United States had gone to war.  Called “The Four Freedoms,” the series included Freedom from WantFreedom from FearFreedom of Speech, and Freedom of Worship.

Unlike much of his other work, these paintings were not designed as illustrations, but rather as original works of art.  More than one million people saw the original paintings in a 16-city tour on behalf of war bonds.  So successful was the tour that over $130 million was raised for the cause.  Publishing the paintings as inside illustrations, The Saturday Evening Post generated an equally impressive response from its readers.  Government agencies that had turned down the series when Rockwell offered it to them soon realized their error, for these powerful images struck a chord that reverberated around the country.

Despite a devastating studio fire in 1943 in which he lost many irreplaceable paintings and sketches, as well as his entire collection of books, antique costumes, and props, Rockwell continued his war effort.  His most memorable covers from the war years include Rosie the RiveterHome for Thanksgiving, and Homecoming G.I.