#2869h – 1994 29c Bat Masterson,single

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U.S. #2869h
1994 29¢ Bat Masterson
Legends of the West

Issue Date: October 18, 1994
City: Laramie, WY, Tucson, AZ and Lawton, OK
Quantity: 19,282,800 panes
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1 x 10
Color: Multicolored
 
Bat Masterson was known more for his handsome dress than as a quick draw, and was more likely to use his cane than his Colt pistols to settle a dispute. But his relentless pursuit of outlaws – he seldom failed to get his man – inspired fear and respect in criminals.
 
Born in Quebec, Canada in 1853, Bat left his family at 19 to become a buffalo hunter. Two years later he was among the hunters besieged by Comanche Indians at the battle of Adobe Walls. While serving as a scout for Colonel Nelson Miles in Texas in 1876, a soldier attempted to shoot Bat for courting his old sweetheart – but instead killed the girl, and wounded Bat. Sprawled on the floor, Bat shot the man through the heart.
 
Bat began a career in law enforcement in 1877 as sheriff of Ford County, home of Dodge City. He served the law in various capacities, marked by stints as a gambler and a sports writer, before settling in Denver. There he managed a theater and gambling house. With gambling on its way out, Bat later moved to New York City. His reputation earned him an appointment to Deputy U.S. Marshall by President Theodore Roosevelt. Later he became a sportswriter, and eventually a sports editor for a prominent newspaper. Bat died while working at his desk in 1921.
 
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U.S. #2869h
1994 29¢ Bat Masterson
Legends of the West

Issue Date: October 18, 1994
City: Laramie, WY, Tucson, AZ and Lawton, OK
Quantity: 19,282,800 panes
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1 x 10
Color: Multicolored
 
Bat Masterson was known more for his handsome dress than as a quick draw, and was more likely to use his cane than his Colt pistols to settle a dispute. But his relentless pursuit of outlaws – he seldom failed to get his man – inspired fear and respect in criminals.
 
Born in Quebec, Canada in 1853, Bat left his family at 19 to become a buffalo hunter. Two years later he was among the hunters besieged by Comanche Indians at the battle of Adobe Walls. While serving as a scout for Colonel Nelson Miles in Texas in 1876, a soldier attempted to shoot Bat for courting his old sweetheart – but instead killed the girl, and wounded Bat. Sprawled on the floor, Bat shot the man through the heart.
 
Bat began a career in law enforcement in 1877 as sheriff of Ford County, home of Dodge City. He served the law in various capacities, marked by stints as a gambler and a sports writer, before settling in Denver. There he managed a theater and gambling house. With gambling on its way out, Bat later moved to New York City. His reputation earned him an appointment to Deputy U.S. Marshall by President Theodore Roosevelt. Later he became a sportswriter, and eventually a sports editor for a prominent newspaper. Bat died while working at his desk in 1921.