#28L3 – 1855-64 2c black, crimson

Condition
Price
Qty
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Usually ships within 30 days.i$55.00
$55.00

Brooklyn City Express Post

Benjamin K. Rogers opened the Brooklyn City Express Post in the spring of 1853.  He placed letterboxes in drug stores and on a few corners.  In 1858, William McNish became a partner and in 1859, he bought out Rogers’ interest in the company.  Under McNish’s leadership, the post expanded and prospered.  He had 12 carriers and 12 collectors, and at its height offered four daily deliveries.  For several years under McNish’s leadership, the post carried 2,500 to 3,000 pieces per day.  The post changed hands a few times after McNish left and closed in 1864.

Local Stamps Make a Neat Addition to Your Collection

Local stamps include stamps issued by Local Posts (city delivery), Independent Mail Routes and Services, Express Companies and other private posts that competed with or supplemented official services. Because only a few local posts used hand stamps for cancelling, most local stamps were left uncancelled. Cancelling, if any, was often done by pen, pencil, or government hand stamp.

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Brooklyn City Express Post

Benjamin K. Rogers opened the Brooklyn City Express Post in the spring of 1853.  He placed letterboxes in drug stores and on a few corners.  In 1858, William McNish became a partner and in 1859, he bought out Rogers’ interest in the company.  Under McNish’s leadership, the post expanded and prospered.  He had 12 carriers and 12 collectors, and at its height offered four daily deliveries.  For several years under McNish’s leadership, the post carried 2,500 to 3,000 pieces per day.  The post changed hands a few times after McNish left and closed in 1864.

Local Stamps Make a Neat Addition to Your Collection

Local stamps include stamps issued by Local Posts (city delivery), Independent Mail Routes and Services, Express Companies and other private posts that competed with or supplemented official services. Because only a few local posts used hand stamps for cancelling, most local stamps were left uncancelled. Cancelling, if any, was often done by pen, pencil, or government hand stamp.