#2950 – 1995 32c Florida Statehood

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U.S. #2950
32¢ Florida Statehood

Issue Date: March 3, 1995
City: Tallahassee, FL
Quantity: 94,500,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
In 1821, as a result of the Spanish-American War, the U.S. formally gained control of Florida, and thousands of American settlers flocked to the new territory. By 1839, a constitution had been drawn up in preparation for statehood. However, since Congress wanted to have an equal number of slave states and free states, it would be nearly six years before Florida was admitted to the Union as a slave state on March 3, 1845.
 
When the Civil War broke out, Florida seceded from the Union and joined the Confederacy. Readmitted to the Union in 1868, the state began to develop rapidly. Railroad lines built by tycoon Henry Flagler led to the opening of new land for development, and resorts sprang up as people and money from the north poured into Florida. The Sunshine State, as it came to be called, continued to grow and prosper until 1926, when a severe depression began a series of financial setbacks that lasted until 1941.
 
Following World War II, Florida’s population began to increase. Tourism once again boomed and industrial development gave the state a more stable financial foundation. Today Florida remains one of the leading resort areas in the United States, attracting more than 40 million tourists annually.
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U.S. #2950
32¢ Florida Statehood

Issue Date: March 3, 1995
City: Tallahassee, FL
Quantity: 94,500,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
In 1821, as a result of the Spanish-American War, the U.S. formally gained control of Florida, and thousands of American settlers flocked to the new territory. By 1839, a constitution had been drawn up in preparation for statehood. However, since Congress wanted to have an equal number of slave states and free states, it would be nearly six years before Florida was admitted to the Union as a slave state on March 3, 1845.
 
When the Civil War broke out, Florida seceded from the Union and joined the Confederacy. Readmitted to the Union in 1868, the state began to develop rapidly. Railroad lines built by tycoon Henry Flagler led to the opening of new land for development, and resorts sprang up as people and money from the north poured into Florida. The Sunshine State, as it came to be called, continued to grow and prosper until 1926, when a severe depression began a series of financial setbacks that lasted until 1941.
 
Following World War II, Florida’s population began to increase. Tourism once again boomed and industrial development gave the state a more stable financial foundation. Today Florida remains one of the leading resort areas in the United States, attracting more than 40 million tourists annually.