#2951-54 – 1995 32c Earth Day

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U.S. #2951-54
32¢ Kids Care About the Environment

Issue Date: April 20, 1995
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 50,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 

The First Earth Day 

On April 22, 1970, some 20 million people took part in the first Earth Day in America.

In 1969, Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson witnessed the effects of the Santa Barbara oil spill and wanted to do something to prevent future horrors. At the time, American schools were a hotbed for anti-war protests. He believed that if he could harness that same enthusiasm for the rising interest in air and water pollution, he could make environmental protection a part of the national political agenda.

Soon after, Nelson publicly announced that he planned to hold a “national teach-in on the environment.” He soon recruited Pete McCloskey to serve as hi co-chair and Denis Hayes as the national coordinator. Hayes assembled a national staff of 85 to push for events around the country. They then selected April 22 as the date for their event, as it fell between spring break and final exams and would allow more students to participate.

As planned, Earth Day 1970 was celebrated around the country on April 22. Some 2,000 colleges, 10,000 primary and secondary schools, and hundreds of communities across American joined in the event. Overall, it “brought 20 million Americans out into the spring sunshine for peaceful demonstrations in favor of environmental reform.”

The largest demonstration took place in New York City. Mayor John Lindsay closed down Fifth Avenue and made Central Park available for the event. An estimated one million people attended the New York City event. And because the city was home to several major television and newspaper producers, it provided substantial coverage.

Different events took place in different cities. People met in the streets, parks, and auditoriums, holding massive rallies calling for environmental improvements. Groups fighting against oil spills, pesticides, freeways, and other causes quickly found they all shared common interests and could be more successful working together.

Earth Day also brought about a rare occurrence. Republicans and Democrats – as well as many other people from opposing walks of life – joined together for a common goal. By the end of 1970, the Earth Day movement helped bring about the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency as well as the passage of the Clean Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species Acts. Nelson later called that, “It was a gamble, but it worked.” For his work, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Twenty years later, Nelson’s partner, Denis Hayes, took the celebrations international. Some 200 million people in 141 countries joined in the 1990 Earth Day event. They brought environmental issues to the world stage. Their efforts brought a major boost to recycling efforts around the globe and led to the 1992 U.N. Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.

Today, Earth Day is celebrated annually by more than two billion people, making it the largest secular observance on the planet.

 
Environmental pollution is one of the most serious problems we face today. In the last 100 years population and industry have grown at a phenomenal rate, and 20th- century inventions, such as the automobile, have caused pollution to become a serious threat to life on earth.
 
Although the damage caused by pollution in some areas is irreversible, in many cases the prevention of pollution would enable us to maintain and even renew diminishing resources. Today federal, state, and local governments across the globe are working to control pollution. Environmental groups formed by private citizens are responsible for much of the action taken by government and industry. In addition to calling attention to problems, they also encourage public officials to take necessary action. Their efforts have resulted in many steps being taken, including recycling, improved technological advancements, and restrictions.
 
In an effort to raise public awareness of environmental issues, the Postal Service produced this set of stamps. Teaming up with McDonalds, they sponsored a stamp design contest for children ages 8-13. The children were asked to show ways to protect, preserve, or restore the environment. More than 150,000 entries were received from which the four winning designs were chosen. The Kids Care stamps marked the first time that the artist's name, as well as age, appeared on each stamp.
 
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U.S. #2951-54
32¢ Kids Care About the Environment

Issue Date: April 20, 1995
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 50,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 

The First Earth Day 

On April 22, 1970, some 20 million people took part in the first Earth Day in America.

In 1969, Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson witnessed the effects of the Santa Barbara oil spill and wanted to do something to prevent future horrors. At the time, American schools were a hotbed for anti-war protests. He believed that if he could harness that same enthusiasm for the rising interest in air and water pollution, he could make environmental protection a part of the national political agenda.

Soon after, Nelson publicly announced that he planned to hold a “national teach-in on the environment.” He soon recruited Pete McCloskey to serve as hi co-chair and Denis Hayes as the national coordinator. Hayes assembled a national staff of 85 to push for events around the country. They then selected April 22 as the date for their event, as it fell between spring break and final exams and would allow more students to participate.

As planned, Earth Day 1970 was celebrated around the country on April 22. Some 2,000 colleges, 10,000 primary and secondary schools, and hundreds of communities across American joined in the event. Overall, it “brought 20 million Americans out into the spring sunshine for peaceful demonstrations in favor of environmental reform.”

The largest demonstration took place in New York City. Mayor John Lindsay closed down Fifth Avenue and made Central Park available for the event. An estimated one million people attended the New York City event. And because the city was home to several major television and newspaper producers, it provided substantial coverage.

Different events took place in different cities. People met in the streets, parks, and auditoriums, holding massive rallies calling for environmental improvements. Groups fighting against oil spills, pesticides, freeways, and other causes quickly found they all shared common interests and could be more successful working together.

Earth Day also brought about a rare occurrence. Republicans and Democrats – as well as many other people from opposing walks of life – joined together for a common goal. By the end of 1970, the Earth Day movement helped bring about the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency as well as the passage of the Clean Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species Acts. Nelson later called that, “It was a gamble, but it worked.” For his work, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Twenty years later, Nelson’s partner, Denis Hayes, took the celebrations international. Some 200 million people in 141 countries joined in the 1990 Earth Day event. They brought environmental issues to the world stage. Their efforts brought a major boost to recycling efforts around the globe and led to the 1992 U.N. Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro.

Today, Earth Day is celebrated annually by more than two billion people, making it the largest secular observance on the planet.

 
Environmental pollution is one of the most serious problems we face today. In the last 100 years population and industry have grown at a phenomenal rate, and 20th- century inventions, such as the automobile, have caused pollution to become a serious threat to life on earth.
 
Although the damage caused by pollution in some areas is irreversible, in many cases the prevention of pollution would enable us to maintain and even renew diminishing resources. Today federal, state, and local governments across the globe are working to control pollution. Environmental groups formed by private citizens are responsible for much of the action taken by government and industry. In addition to calling attention to problems, they also encourage public officials to take necessary action. Their efforts have resulted in many steps being taken, including recycling, improved technological advancements, and restrictions.
 
In an effort to raise public awareness of environmental issues, the Postal Service produced this set of stamps. Teaming up with McDonalds, they sponsored a stamp design contest for children ages 8-13. The children were asked to show ways to protect, preserve, or restore the environment. More than 150,000 entries were received from which the four winning designs were chosen. The Kids Care stamps marked the first time that the artist's name, as well as age, appeared on each stamp.