#2956 – 1995 32c Bessie Coleman

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.50FREE with 300 points!
$1.50
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.20
$0.20
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM50230x45mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420330x45mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
$3.50
U.S. #2956
1995 32¢ Bessie Coleman
Black Heritage Series

Issue Date: April 27, 1995
City: Chicago, IL
Quantity: 97,000,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Engraved
Perforations:
11.2
Color: Red and black
 
In Black Wings, William Powell wrote, “Because of Bessie Coleman, we have overcome that which was much worse than racial barriers. We have overcome the barriers within ourselves and dared to dream.”
 
Born in 1892 and raised in the cotton fields of Texas, Bessie Coleman dared to dream that one day she would become someone history would remember. Working as a manicurist in Chicago, she was inspired by tales of female aviators in France during World War I, and decided to become a pilot. When no one in America would teach her how to fly, she traveled to France. In 1921 she received her license from the prestigious Fédération Aéronautique Internationale in 1921.
 
Coleman returned to America a celebrity. Flying in exhibitions and lecturing on the potential of both flight and her race, she inspired others with her positive attitude and determination to succeed. Coleman hoped to open a flying school for other African-Americans, and was close to achieving that goal when, in 1926, she died in the crash of a flimsy World War I Army surplus plane.
 
On February 26, 1992, the Chicago City Council passed a resolution requesting that the U.S. Postal Service issue a stamp commemorating Bessie Coleman and her ground-breaking achievements.
Read More - Click Here


  • Imperforate Stamp Club Introductory Offer - 2015 49c A Charlie Brown Christmas Join Mystic's Imperforate Stamp Club and Save 30%

    Collect some of the scarcest US stamps issued in the last decade.  From 2012 to 2016, the USPS issued extremely limited quantities of imperforate stamps (as few as 10,000 in some cases).  On sale for just four years, it can be difficult to find them anywhere today.

    $18.95
    BUY NOW
  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #2956
1995 32¢ Bessie Coleman
Black Heritage Series

Issue Date: April 27, 1995
City: Chicago, IL
Quantity: 97,000,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Engraved
Perforations:
11.2
Color: Red and black
 
In Black Wings, William Powell wrote, “Because of Bessie Coleman, we have overcome that which was much worse than racial barriers. We have overcome the barriers within ourselves and dared to dream.”
 
Born in 1892 and raised in the cotton fields of Texas, Bessie Coleman dared to dream that one day she would become someone history would remember. Working as a manicurist in Chicago, she was inspired by tales of female aviators in France during World War I, and decided to become a pilot. When no one in America would teach her how to fly, she traveled to France. In 1921 she received her license from the prestigious Fédération Aéronautique Internationale in 1921.
 
Coleman returned to America a celebrity. Flying in exhibitions and lecturing on the potential of both flight and her race, she inspired others with her positive attitude and determination to succeed. Coleman hoped to open a flying school for other African-Americans, and was close to achieving that goal when, in 1926, she died in the crash of a flimsy World War I Army surplus plane.
 
On February 26, 1992, the Chicago City Council passed a resolution requesting that the U.S. Postal Service issue a stamp commemorating Bessie Coleman and her ground-breaking achievements.