#2966 – 1995 32c Prisoners of War & MIA

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.30
$1.30
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.15
$0.15
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Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63725 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 32 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-1/4 inches)
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$7.50
$7.50
- MM67150 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 45 x 32 millimeters (1-3/4 x 1-1/4 inches)
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$8.00
$8.00
- MM4202Mystic Clear Mount 45x30mm - 50 precut drop end mounts
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$1.95
$1.95
U.S. #2966
1995 32¢ POW & MIA

Issue Date: May 29, 1995
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 125,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.2
Color: Multicolored
 
“The Postal Service is proud to announce the issuance of a stamp remembering those that have not returned, and to thank those who endured captivity and came back as heroes ... neither they, nor their deeds must ever be forgotten.” With those words the Postal Service, which is the largest single employer of veterans in the U.S., expressed the gratitude felt by the entire nation for its prisoners of war, or POWs, and those missing in action, or MIAs. An MIA is a member of the armed forces reported missing after a combat mission, and whose condition is unknown.
 
In 1785 the United States and Prussia became the first countries ever to sign a treaty establishing standards for the treatment of POWs. Since that time the Hague conventions of 1899 and 1907, as well as the Geneva conventions of 1929 and 1949, have extended and expanded those rights. Unfortunately these rules are not always followed, and enforcement is difficult.
 
Today there are more than 88,000 people listed as having POW/MIA status. Recent efforts have concentrated on bringing a sense of closure to the surviving families.           
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U.S. #2966
1995 32¢ POW & MIA

Issue Date: May 29, 1995
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 125,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.2
Color: Multicolored
 
“The Postal Service is proud to announce the issuance of a stamp remembering those that have not returned, and to thank those who endured captivity and came back as heroes ... neither they, nor their deeds must ever be forgotten.” With those words the Postal Service, which is the largest single employer of veterans in the U.S., expressed the gratitude felt by the entire nation for its prisoners of war, or POWs, and those missing in action, or MIAs. An MIA is a member of the armed forces reported missing after a combat mission, and whose condition is unknown.
 
In 1785 the United States and Prussia became the first countries ever to sign a treaty establishing standards for the treatment of POWs. Since that time the Hague conventions of 1899 and 1907, as well as the Geneva conventions of 1929 and 1949, have extended and expanded those rights. Unfortunately these rules are not always followed, and enforcement is difficult.
 
Today there are more than 88,000 people listed as having POW/MIA status. Recent efforts have concentrated on bringing a sense of closure to the surviving families.