#2975q – 1995 32c William T. Sherman

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U.S. #2975q
1995 32¢ William T. Sherman
Civil War

Issue Date: June 29, 1995
City: Gettysburg, PA
Quantity: 15,000,000 panes of 20
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
The release of the 20 Civil War stamps marked the most extensive effort in the history of the U.S. Postal Service to review and verify the historical accuracy of stamp subjects. Each of the 16 individuals and four battles featured were chosen from a master list of 50 subjects, which included Presidents, generals, major battles, rank-and-file soldiers, women, African and Native Americans, and abolitionists. The goal of the U.S.P.S. was to show the wide variety of people who participated in the Civil War.
 
William T. Sherman
At the outbreak of the Civil War, William T. Sherman was offered a Confederate commission. He turned it down, and instead accepted the colonelcy of the 13th Infantry. In 1862, he was placed in command of a division in Grant’s Army of the Tennessee, beginning one of the great partnerships of the war. Following the Battle of Shiloh, Grant assigned him leading roles in what became two of the greatest campaigns of the war – Vicksburg and Chattanooga.
 
When Grant was appointed commander in chief in 1864, Sherman succeeded him as senior commander in the west. His campaign against General Johnston ended four months later with the capture of Atlanta. Believing the war could only be ended when its harsh realities were brought home to the civilians that supported the front, he put his theory to the test in Atlanta, ordering the destruction of all property with military value. On November 15th, he set out on his famous “march to the sea.” His union with Grant was another brilliant success, and 17 days after Lee surrendered, Johnston surrendered to Sherman, ending the war in the east. Asked by Republicans and Democrats to run for president, Sherman steadfastly refused. In 1869 he succeeded Grant as commander in chief of the army.
 
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U.S. #2975q
1995 32¢ William T. Sherman
Civil War

Issue Date: June 29, 1995
City: Gettysburg, PA
Quantity: 15,000,000 panes of 20
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
The release of the 20 Civil War stamps marked the most extensive effort in the history of the U.S. Postal Service to review and verify the historical accuracy of stamp subjects. Each of the 16 individuals and four battles featured were chosen from a master list of 50 subjects, which included Presidents, generals, major battles, rank-and-file soldiers, women, African and Native Americans, and abolitionists. The goal of the U.S.P.S. was to show the wide variety of people who participated in the Civil War.
 
William T. Sherman
At the outbreak of the Civil War, William T. Sherman was offered a Confederate commission. He turned it down, and instead accepted the colonelcy of the 13th Infantry. In 1862, he was placed in command of a division in Grant’s Army of the Tennessee, beginning one of the great partnerships of the war. Following the Battle of Shiloh, Grant assigned him leading roles in what became two of the greatest campaigns of the war – Vicksburg and Chattanooga.
 
When Grant was appointed commander in chief in 1864, Sherman succeeded him as senior commander in the west. His campaign against General Johnston ended four months later with the capture of Atlanta. Believing the war could only be ended when its harsh realities were brought home to the civilians that supported the front, he put his theory to the test in Atlanta, ordering the destruction of all property with military value. On November 15th, he set out on his famous “march to the sea.” His union with Grant was another brilliant success, and 17 days after Lee surrendered, Johnston surrendered to Sherman, ending the war in the east. Asked by Republicans and Democrats to run for president, Sherman steadfastly refused. In 1869 he succeeded Grant as commander in chief of the army.