#2976-79 – 1995 32c Carousel Horses

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- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$6.50FREE with 1,580 points!
$6.50
- Used Single Stamp(s)
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$0.80
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- MM2206131x86mm 1 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mount
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$1.50
$1.50
- MM644215x46mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
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$7.95
$7.95
- MM50230x45mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
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$3.50
$3.50
- MM420330x45mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
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$3.50
$3.50
- MM611056x86mm 2 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
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$1.75
$1.75
U.S. #2976
32¢ Carousel Horses
American Folk Art Series
 
Issue Date: July 21, 1995
City: Lahaska, PA
Quantity: 65,500,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommer for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
Carousels have a long and fascinating history that can be traced as far back as early Byzantine times. Rather than being used for amusement however, early carousels were actually used for training purposes. In fact, the word itself comes from 12th-century Arabian games of horsemanship called carosellos or “little wars.” Fragile, heavily scented clay balls were tossed from one rider to another; dexterity and equestrian skill was needed to avoid the unmanly mark of the loser – a bath of sweet smelling perfume.
 
By the late 17th century, carousels had been developed to train young noblemen for spearing contests. Seated on wooden horses the riders tried to lance rings as they rode around a pole. Forerunner of the modern day carousel and its game of “catching the brass ring,” the ride evolved into a popular form of entertainment.
 
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U.S. #2976
32¢ Carousel Horses
American Folk Art Series
 
Issue Date: July 21, 1995
City: Lahaska, PA
Quantity: 65,500,000
Printed By: Sterling Sommer for Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
Carousels have a long and fascinating history that can be traced as far back as early Byzantine times. Rather than being used for amusement however, early carousels were actually used for training purposes. In fact, the word itself comes from 12th-century Arabian games of horsemanship called carosellos or “little wars.” Fragile, heavily scented clay balls were tossed from one rider to another; dexterity and equestrian skill was needed to avoid the unmanly mark of the loser – a bath of sweet smelling perfume.
 
By the late 17th century, carousels had been developed to train young noblemen for spearing contests. Seated on wooden horses the riders tried to lance rings as they rode around a pole. Forerunner of the modern day carousel and its game of “catching the brass ring,” the ride evolved into a popular form of entertainment.