#2981j – 1995 32c World War II: Hometowns Honor Their Returning Veterans

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U.S. #2981j
1995 32¢ Hometowns Honor Vets
WWII – 1945: Victory at Last

Issue Date: September 2, 1995
City: Honolulu, HI
Quantity: 5,000,000 panes of 20
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
The fifth and final installment of the World War II series commemorates the 50th anniversary of the war's final year. Titled "1945: Victory at Last," these 10 stamps chronicle the events leading to Germany's surrender, the Japanese surrender, and ultimately the Allied victory. Nearly 300,000 American service personnel lost their lives between 1941 and 1945.
 
Hometowns Honor Vets
With the war over the folks back home eagerly awaited their servicemen’s return. Some had quite a wait, as soldiers were given various occupational duties, but each returning veteran was treated to a hero’s welcome. Parades and celebrations featuring these heroes were held everywhere. As you can see in the photo, the servicemen were equally enthusiastic.
 
America had changed while the veterans had been away. Although the country looked much the same, with the addition of some new factories, social and political changes had permanently reshaped the nation. Millions of women had taken jobs outside of their homes and experienced the benefits and high pay of industrial jobs. African-Americans were given new opportunities – the Fair Employment Practices Committee created by President Roosevelt in 1941 prevented job discrimination in defense industries. And due to higher wartime wages, a larger property-owning middle class had been created.
 
Surveys showed that returning servicemen had been worried about their future employment and the return of the Great Depression, but the years following World War II were quite prosperous. For most Americans simply being at peace was the best reward.
 
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U.S. #2981j
1995 32¢ Hometowns Honor Vets
WWII – 1945: Victory at Last

Issue Date: September 2, 1995
City: Honolulu, HI
Quantity: 5,000,000 panes of 20
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
The fifth and final installment of the World War II series commemorates the 50th anniversary of the war's final year. Titled "1945: Victory at Last," these 10 stamps chronicle the events leading to Germany's surrender, the Japanese surrender, and ultimately the Allied victory. Nearly 300,000 American service personnel lost their lives between 1941 and 1945.
 
Hometowns Honor Vets
With the war over the folks back home eagerly awaited their servicemen’s return. Some had quite a wait, as soldiers were given various occupational duties, but each returning veteran was treated to a hero’s welcome. Parades and celebrations featuring these heroes were held everywhere. As you can see in the photo, the servicemen were equally enthusiastic.
 
America had changed while the veterans had been away. Although the country looked much the same, with the addition of some new factories, social and political changes had permanently reshaped the nation. Millions of women had taken jobs outside of their homes and experienced the benefits and high pay of industrial jobs. African-Americans were given new opportunities – the Fair Employment Practices Committee created by President Roosevelt in 1941 prevented job discrimination in defense industries. And due to higher wartime wages, a larger property-owning middle class had been created.
 
Surveys showed that returning servicemen had been worried about their future employment and the return of the Great Depression, but the years following World War II were quite prosperous. For most Americans simply being at peace was the best reward.