#3000d – 1995 32c "Bringing Up Father"

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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U.S. #3000d
32¢ Bringing Up Father
Comic Strip Classics

Issue Date: October 1, 1995
City: Boca Rotan, FL
Quantity: 300,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
George McManus created a number of comics with varying degrees of success before he came up with Bringing Up Father in 1913. The strip told the saga of Jiggs, an Irish-American bricklayer suddenly made wealthy by the Irish sweepstakes, and his socially ambitious wife Maggie. Readers of all walks of life could identify with the henpecked Jiggs and eventually the strip became popularly known as Maggie and Jiggs. Jiggs’ habit of escaping from Maggie’s fancy parties to eat corned beef and cabbage popularized the dish.
 
Reportedly McManus strongly resembled his character Jiggs, while his wife Florence, a former chorus girl, was the model for Jiggs’ daughter Nora – not Jiggs’ battle-axe wife Maggie! One of the most accomplished draftsman ever to draw a humor strip, McManus began working for the St. Louis Republic at age sixteen. His artwork strongly reflected influences of both Art Nouveau and Art Deco.
 
Bringing up Father was one of the most widely syndicated strips of the “Golden Age of Comics,” appearing at the height of its popularity in 500 newspapers in 20 languages in 71 countries. Today it remains one of the original comics published during the first fifty years that is still in syndication.
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U.S. #3000d
32¢ Bringing Up Father
Comic Strip Classics

Issue Date: October 1, 1995
City: Boca Rotan, FL
Quantity: 300,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
George McManus created a number of comics with varying degrees of success before he came up with Bringing Up Father in 1913. The strip told the saga of Jiggs, an Irish-American bricklayer suddenly made wealthy by the Irish sweepstakes, and his socially ambitious wife Maggie. Readers of all walks of life could identify with the henpecked Jiggs and eventually the strip became popularly known as Maggie and Jiggs. Jiggs’ habit of escaping from Maggie’s fancy parties to eat corned beef and cabbage popularized the dish.
 
Reportedly McManus strongly resembled his character Jiggs, while his wife Florence, a former chorus girl, was the model for Jiggs’ daughter Nora – not Jiggs’ battle-axe wife Maggie! One of the most accomplished draftsman ever to draw a humor strip, McManus began working for the St. Louis Republic at age sixteen. His artwork strongly reflected influences of both Art Nouveau and Art Deco.
 
Bringing up Father was one of the most widely syndicated strips of the “Golden Age of Comics,” appearing at the height of its popularity in 500 newspapers in 20 languages in 71 countries. Today it remains one of the original comics published during the first fifty years that is still in syndication.