#3000g – 1995 32c Comic Strip Classics: Toonerville Folks

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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- MM641215x38mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
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U.S. #3000g
32¢ Toonerville Folks
Comic Strip Classics


Issue Date: October 1, 1995
City: Boca Rotan, FL
Quantity: 300,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
Fontaine Fox’s strip chronicled the doings of the eccentric characters who inhabited his imaginary suburbs. His daily panels appeared in the Chicago Post as early as 1908, before the Wheeler Syndicate began distributing the strip nationally, but the strip is generally considered to have begun in 1910. When a Sunday page was added a decade later, both the daily and weekly features were distributed under the name Toonerville Folks.
 
Besides the Skipper in his famous doodle-car, other Toonerville folks included tough-kid Mickey McGuire, the Powerful Katrinka, and the Terrible-Tempered Mr. Bang. Skipper Silas Tooner and his out-of-control trolley inspired numerous toys, movies, and games. And eventually the trolley car – “The Toonerville Trolley That Meets All Trains” – became just as famous as any of the human characters. In fact, over time, the term “Toonerville Trolley” became synonymous with an antiquated street railway.
 
Fox – whose trademark signature had six parallel lines above the Fs in his name – is one of the few cartoonists to have drawn one feature exclusively during his career. The panel ran until 1956, when Fox retired his comic. At his request, there were no successors.
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U.S. #3000g
32¢ Toonerville Folks
Comic Strip Classics


Issue Date: October 1, 1995
City: Boca Rotan, FL
Quantity: 300,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
Fontaine Fox’s strip chronicled the doings of the eccentric characters who inhabited his imaginary suburbs. His daily panels appeared in the Chicago Post as early as 1908, before the Wheeler Syndicate began distributing the strip nationally, but the strip is generally considered to have begun in 1910. When a Sunday page was added a decade later, both the daily and weekly features were distributed under the name Toonerville Folks.
 
Besides the Skipper in his famous doodle-car, other Toonerville folks included tough-kid Mickey McGuire, the Powerful Katrinka, and the Terrible-Tempered Mr. Bang. Skipper Silas Tooner and his out-of-control trolley inspired numerous toys, movies, and games. And eventually the trolley car – “The Toonerville Trolley That Meets All Trains” – became just as famous as any of the human characters. In fact, over time, the term “Toonerville Trolley” became synonymous with an antiquated street railway.
 
Fox – whose trademark signature had six parallel lines above the Fs in his name – is one of the few cartoonists to have drawn one feature exclusively during his career. The panel ran until 1956, when Fox retired his comic. At his request, there were no successors.