#3000p – 1995 32c Comic Strip Classics: Flash Gordon

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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- MM641215x38mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
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- MM77748x38mm 5 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
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U.S. #3000p
32¢ Flash Gordon
Comic Strip Classics

Issue Date: October 1, 1995
City: Boca Rotan, FL
Quantity: 300,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
As travel by car, boat, and plane became more practical during the 1920s, Americans dreamed of adventure in far-off places – even space travel seemed possible. To make adventure strips realistic and believable, publishers turned to talented illustrators who could draw handsome men, beautiful women, lush landscapes, and convincing fight scenes.
 
In 1934, when King Features decided to launch a rival to the popular Buck Rogers, it called on the multi-talented Alex Raymond. His memorable villains, exotic locales, and breathless action made Flash Gordon a science-fiction classic.
 
As a young man growing up in New Rochelle, New York – home to Norman Rockwell and other well-known illustrators – Raymond aspired to be an artist. He assisted on several other strips, including Blondie, before his style turned realistic. One of the best draftsman in the field of newspaper comics, Raymond also created Secret Agent X-9 and Jungle Jim, both of which were drawn simultaneously with Flash Gordon. During World War II, when Raymond served in the Marine Corps, the strip was taken over by others. After the war, he began the popular detective strip Rip Kirby, which he continued until his death in 1956.
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U.S. #3000p
32¢ Flash Gordon
Comic Strip Classics

Issue Date: October 1, 1995
City: Boca Rotan, FL
Quantity: 300,000,000
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
As travel by car, boat, and plane became more practical during the 1920s, Americans dreamed of adventure in far-off places – even space travel seemed possible. To make adventure strips realistic and believable, publishers turned to talented illustrators who could draw handsome men, beautiful women, lush landscapes, and convincing fight scenes.
 
In 1934, when King Features decided to launch a rival to the popular Buck Rogers, it called on the multi-talented Alex Raymond. His memorable villains, exotic locales, and breathless action made Flash Gordon a science-fiction classic.
 
As a young man growing up in New Rochelle, New York – home to Norman Rockwell and other well-known illustrators – Raymond aspired to be an artist. He assisted on several other strips, including Blondie, before his style turned realistic. One of the best draftsman in the field of newspaper comics, Raymond also created Secret Agent X-9 and Jungle Jim, both of which were drawn simultaneously with Flash Gordon. During World War II, when Raymond served in the Marine Corps, the strip was taken over by others. After the war, he began the popular detective strip Rip Kirby, which he continued until his death in 1956.