Website maintenance in progress – checkout and rewards are temporarily disabled. Sorry for any inconvenience.

#303 – 1903 4c Grant, brown

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$65.00FREE with 17,940 points!
$65.00
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$2.00FREE with 490 points!
$2.00
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$42.00FREE with 11,590 points!
$42.00
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.50
$1.50
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
$7.50
- MM50350 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 27 x 30 millimeters (1 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.95
$2.95
- MM4200Mystic Clear Mount 27x30mm - 50 precut mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
$1.95
 
U.S. #303
Series of 1902-03 4¢ Grant

Issue Date: February 10, 1903
Quantity issued:
 346,666,374 (estimate)
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Method: Flat plate
Watermark: Double line
Perforation: 12
Color: Brown
 
Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885) is pictured on the 4¢ Series of 1902-03 stamp. Grant led the Union Army to victory during the Civil War. Grant’s victories in the south during the Mississippi campaign, and his defeat of Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia led to the fall of the Confederacy in 1865.
 
Three years later, Grant was elected President, the youngest man in history to do so at the time. A hard working administrator with a strong foreign policy, Grant was able to separate himself from scandals that plagued his administration. 
 
On older issues, General Grant was pictured on the five-cent stamp while President Lincoln was on the four-cent. However, in the new issues this was reversed, so that Lincoln would be on the more widely circulated stamp. The 4¢ Grant stamp didn’t pay any specific rate. It was primarily used in multiples to pay the 8¢ Registry Fee or 12¢ for a domestic first-class letter with Special Delivery.
 
In a single print run, 10,000 imperforate 4¢ Grant stamps were provided to a Detroit Post Office. The stamps were used by the Schermack Company, a stamp vending machine company. About 50 examples survive, along with four on cover, and are desirable U.S. stamp rarities.      
 
Series of 1902-03
In 1902, the Postmaster General commissioned an entirely new series of general issues. Until this time, the current regular issues had been in use since 1890 with relatively few changes.
 
The ornate new designs, however, were not the only addition to the 1902 series. The 13-cent denomination was added, and two new faces were introduced – Benjamin Harrison and Admiral David Farragut. For the first time in postal history, an American woman was honored.
 
A slight change was also made in the format. Each stamp in this series bears the inscription, “Series 1902.” This caused some concern abroad, as many European philatelists wondered whether the U.S. was planning on issuing new stamps each year. Many of the stamps, however, did not even reach post offices until 1903, and the next general issues were not produced until 1908.
Read More - Click Here

  • 1855-2016 Mystic's Historic Stamps of the United States Album and FREE 100 Used Stamps, 1000 Hinges and Collecting Guide U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps 3-Volume American Heirloom Album

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Mystic Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Volume I, 1847-1934 Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

 
U.S. #303
Series of 1902-03 4¢ Grant

Issue Date: February 10, 1903
Quantity issued:
 346,666,374 (estimate)
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Method: Flat plate
Watermark: Double line
Perforation: 12
Color: Brown
 
Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885) is pictured on the 4¢ Series of 1902-03 stamp. Grant led the Union Army to victory during the Civil War. Grant’s victories in the south during the Mississippi campaign, and his defeat of Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia led to the fall of the Confederacy in 1865.
 
Three years later, Grant was elected President, the youngest man in history to do so at the time. A hard working administrator with a strong foreign policy, Grant was able to separate himself from scandals that plagued his administration. 
 
On older issues, General Grant was pictured on the five-cent stamp while President Lincoln was on the four-cent. However, in the new issues this was reversed, so that Lincoln would be on the more widely circulated stamp. The 4¢ Grant stamp didn’t pay any specific rate. It was primarily used in multiples to pay the 8¢ Registry Fee or 12¢ for a domestic first-class letter with Special Delivery.
 
In a single print run, 10,000 imperforate 4¢ Grant stamps were provided to a Detroit Post Office. The stamps were used by the Schermack Company, a stamp vending machine company. About 50 examples survive, along with four on cover, and are desirable U.S. stamp rarities.      
 
Series of 1902-03
In 1902, the Postmaster General commissioned an entirely new series of general issues. Until this time, the current regular issues had been in use since 1890 with relatively few changes.
 
The ornate new designs, however, were not the only addition to the 1902 series. The 13-cent denomination was added, and two new faces were introduced – Benjamin Harrison and Admiral David Farragut. For the first time in postal history, an American woman was honored.
 
A slight change was also made in the format. Each stamp in this series bears the inscription, “Series 1902.” This caused some concern abroad, as many European philatelists wondered whether the U.S. was planning on issuing new stamps each year. Many of the stamps, however, did not even reach post offices until 1903, and the next general issues were not produced until 1908.