#3061 – 1996 32c Pioneers of Communication: Eadweard Muybridge

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U.S. #3061
32¢ Eadweard Muybridge
Pioneers of Communication

Issue Date: February 22, 1996
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 23,292,500
Printed By: Ashton-Potter USA
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Eadweard Muybridge was born April 9, 1830, a Kingston upon Thames, Surrey, England. He emigrated to the United States in 1868, but remained obscure until his large photographs of Yosemite Valley, California, made him world famous. Muybridge began experimenting with photographing motion when railroad magnate and former California Gov. Leland Stanford hired him to prove that at a certain point in a horse’s gallop, all four of its legs are off the ground.
 
To capture images of a running horse, Muybridge used a series of 12 to 24 cameras, which were triggered by strings – the horse broke the strings as it ran by, thus taking the horse’s picture at various stages of its stride. His first attempts failed because his camera lacked the fast shutter speeds needed. By 1877, Muybridge had developed a high-speed shutter with an exposure time of 2/1,000 of a second. The experiment worked, and the resulting photographs proved Stanford was right!
 
To display his pictures, Muybridge invented the zoopraxiscope – a lantern that projected images on a screen in rapid succession from photographs printed on a rotating glass disc. The spinning of the disk gave the pictures the illusion of movement. Muybridge retired to the place of his birth in 1900.
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U.S. #3061
32¢ Eadweard Muybridge
Pioneers of Communication

Issue Date: February 22, 1996
City: New York, NY
Quantity: 23,292,500
Printed By: Ashton-Potter USA
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11.1 x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Eadweard Muybridge was born April 9, 1830, a Kingston upon Thames, Surrey, England. He emigrated to the United States in 1868, but remained obscure until his large photographs of Yosemite Valley, California, made him world famous. Muybridge began experimenting with photographing motion when railroad magnate and former California Gov. Leland Stanford hired him to prove that at a certain point in a horse’s gallop, all four of its legs are off the ground.
 
To capture images of a running horse, Muybridge used a series of 12 to 24 cameras, which were triggered by strings – the horse broke the strings as it ran by, thus taking the horse’s picture at various stages of its stride. His first attempts failed because his camera lacked the fast shutter speeds needed. By 1877, Muybridge had developed a high-speed shutter with an exposure time of 2/1,000 of a second. The experiment worked, and the resulting photographs proved Stanford was right!
 
To display his pictures, Muybridge invented the zoopraxiscope – a lantern that projected images on a screen in rapid succession from photographs printed on a rotating glass disc. The spinning of the disk gave the pictures the illusion of movement. Muybridge retired to the place of his birth in 1900.