#3068l – 1996 32c Olympic Games: Men's Rowing

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U.S. #3068l
32¢ Men’s Rowing
1996 Summer Olympics

Issue Date: May 2, 1996
City: Washington, DC and Atlanta, GA
Quantity: 16,207,500
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
Men’s rowing events were first at the 1900 Olympics. The first women’s competitions were held at the 1976 Olympics. Light-weight competitions will be held for men under 160 pounds, and women under 130 pounds, for the first time at the 1996 games.
 
There are two main types of racing: sculling and sweep-oar rowing. In sculling, the rower, or sculler, uses two oars. Both the boat and the oars are called sculls. In sweep-oar rowing, each athlete uses one oar, which is much larger and longer than scull oars. These boats are called shells, since they are much lighter than normal rowboats. A non-rowing crew member called a coxswain may also play an important part in rowing. The coxswain steers the boat, and may also direct the pace of the rowers.
 
Men’s events include: single sculls; double sculls; quadruple sculls; paired-oar shell with, and without coxswain; four-oared shell with, and without, coxswain; and eight-oared shell with coxswain. All men’s events are 2,000 meters long. Women compete in single sculls, double sculls, quadruple sculls with coxswain, pair-oared shell, and eight-oared shell with coxswain. All women’s events are 1,000 meters long.
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U.S. #3068l
32¢ Men’s Rowing
1996 Summer Olympics

Issue Date: May 2, 1996
City: Washington, DC and Atlanta, GA
Quantity: 16,207,500
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
Men’s rowing events were first at the 1900 Olympics. The first women’s competitions were held at the 1976 Olympics. Light-weight competitions will be held for men under 160 pounds, and women under 130 pounds, for the first time at the 1996 games.
 
There are two main types of racing: sculling and sweep-oar rowing. In sculling, the rower, or sculler, uses two oars. Both the boat and the oars are called sculls. In sweep-oar rowing, each athlete uses one oar, which is much larger and longer than scull oars. These boats are called shells, since they are much lighter than normal rowboats. A non-rowing crew member called a coxswain may also play an important part in rowing. The coxswain steers the boat, and may also direct the pace of the rowers.
 
Men’s events include: single sculls; double sculls; quadruple sculls; paired-oar shell with, and without coxswain; four-oared shell with, and without, coxswain; and eight-oared shell with coxswain. All men’s events are 2,000 meters long. Women compete in single sculls, double sculls, quadruple sculls with coxswain, pair-oared shell, and eight-oared shell with coxswain. All women’s events are 1,000 meters long.