#3068n – 1996 32c Olympic Games: Women's Swimming

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U.S. #3068n
32¢ Women’s Swimming
1996 Summer Olympics

Issue Date: May 2, 1996
City: Washington, DC and Atlanta, GA
Quantity: 16,207,500
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
Throughout the ages, swimming has been a popular form of exercise and recreation. In fact, the sport was part of mandatory education for young males in ancient Greece and Rome. Not surprisingly, when the first modern Olympics were held in 1896, swimming events were part of the competition. Only men were permitted to compete, however, and it wasn’t until 1912 that women’s swimming events were added. Today, both the men’s and women’s swimming races continue to be a highlight of the summer games.
 
Like the men’s competition, women’s swimming events include six kinds of races – freestyle, breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly, individual medley, and relays. Women’s freestyle races are held at distances of 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 meters. Although a swimmer may choose any stroke, many use the front crawl because it is the fastest stroke.
 
Breaststroke, backstroke, and butterfly events are 100 and 200 meters long, while the individual medley, in which swimmers use all four strokes, covers 200 and 400 meters. Among the most exciting races are team relays. A team consists of four swimmers, each of whom swims an equal distance. Synchronized swimming is also part of the women’s events.
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U.S. #3068n
32¢ Women’s Swimming
1996 Summer Olympics

Issue Date: May 2, 1996
City: Washington, DC and Atlanta, GA
Quantity: 16,207,500
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
Throughout the ages, swimming has been a popular form of exercise and recreation. In fact, the sport was part of mandatory education for young males in ancient Greece and Rome. Not surprisingly, when the first modern Olympics were held in 1896, swimming events were part of the competition. Only men were permitted to compete, however, and it wasn’t until 1912 that women’s swimming events were added. Today, both the men’s and women’s swimming races continue to be a highlight of the summer games.
 
Like the men’s competition, women’s swimming events include six kinds of races – freestyle, breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly, individual medley, and relays. Women’s freestyle races are held at distances of 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 meters. Although a swimmer may choose any stroke, many use the front crawl because it is the fastest stroke.
 
Breaststroke, backstroke, and butterfly events are 100 and 200 meters long, while the individual medley, in which swimmers use all four strokes, covers 200 and 400 meters. Among the most exciting races are team relays. A team consists of four swimmers, each of whom swims an equal distance. Synchronized swimming is also part of the women’s events.