#3068q – 1996 32c Olympic Games: Men's Swimming

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-3 business days.i$1.75
$1.75
4 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM644215x46mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-3 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM214338x46mm 15 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-3 business days.i
$3.25
$3.25
 
U.S. #3068q
32¢ Men’s Swimming
1996 Summer Olympics

Issue Date: May 2, 1996
City: Washington, DC and Atlanta, GA
Quantity: 16,207,500
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
The swimming contests of the first modern Olympic games in 1896 were held outdoors in open water. Swimmers not only battled unusually cold weather and frigid water temperatures of 55 degrees Fahrenheit, but also waves that rose as high as 12 feet!­ Alfred Hajos, the gold medal winner of the 1500-meter freestyle that year, who had coated himself with a half-inch thick layer of grease to protect himself from the cold, credited his speedy finish of the race to his “will to live.”
 
Today, individual male athletes compete in 16 different swimming events at the Olympics. Four different strokes are used in these events: the crawl, which is not officially recognized as a stroke, but is used in all freestyle competitions due to its speed; the backstroke, the breaststroke, and the butterfly. Individual freestyle races vary in length from 50 meters to 1500 meters. Men’s backstroke, breaststroke, and butterfly races are 100 meters and 200 meters in length.
 
In addition to these races, swimmers compete in the 200-meter and 400-meter individual medleys, in which equal distances of each stroke are swum. Teams of four swimmers compete in the 400-meter and 800-meter freestyle relay and 800-meter medley relay, in which each member of the team swims a different stroke.
 

Happy Birthday, Duke Kahanamoku

2002 37¢ Duke Kahanamoku stamp
US #3660 was issued on Duke’s 112th birthday.

Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku (also known as “The Duke” and “The Big Kahuna”) was born on August 24, 1890, in Haleʻākala, Honolulu, Kingdom of Hawaii.  Duke was a record-setting Olympic swimmer who helped popularize surfing outside of Hawaii.

Duke’s family was related to the Kamehamehas, who’d led Hawaii for several years – his family was considered lower-ranking nobles.  When he was three, his family moved to Kālia, Waikiki, to be closer to his extended family.  He grew up with five brothers, three sisters, and 31 cousins.  Duke attended school there but didn’t graduate, instead leaving school to help support his family.

1996 32¢ Olympic Games: Men's Swimming stamp
US #3068q – Duke won three gold and two silver medals during his Olympic career.

Duke spent much of his spare time on the beach, surfing and swimming.  Surfing was an ancient Polynesian sport that had declined in most of the Pacific by 1900.  “He’enalu” (wave-sliding) was still practiced in Waikiki where Duke grew up though.  He was a strong swimmer.  In fact, in August 1911, he reportedly set a new 100-yard freestyle world record of 55.4 seconds, 4.6 seconds better than the existing, officially recognized world record.  Duke also broke the 200-yard and 50-yard records, but the Amateur Athletic Union didn’t believe him and didn’t give him credit for these accomplishments for many years.

In spite of this snub, Duke easily qualified for the US Olympic swimming team in 1912, the first of five trips he’d make to the Olympics.  In his first Olympics, in 1912, he almost slept through the 100-meter freestyle.  He persuaded officials to delay the race long enough for him to put a swimsuit on, then went on to break the Olympic record and to win the gold medal.

2002 37¢ Duke Kahanamoku Fleetwood Plate Block First Day Cover
US #3660 – Fleetwood Plate Block First Day Cover

Duke won two more gold medals at Antwerp in the 1920 games.  He and his brother Samuel stood together on the podium in Paris in 1924, where Duke won the silver and Samuel won the bronze in the 100-meter freestyle event.  Duke was also on the US water polo team in the 1932 Olympics but did not participate in a game.

2002 37¢ Duke Kahanamoku Mystic First Day Cover
US #3660 – Mystic First Day Cover

In between his Olympic appearances and after retiring from them, Duke traveled the world for swimming exhibitions.  While on these trips he also put on surfing exhibitions, which helped to popularize the sport.  Previously, it wasn’t well known outside of Hawaii.  Duke brought surfing to California in 1912 and lived there for several years.  During his time in California, Duke worked as a background actor and character actor in several Hollywood films.

2009 44¢ Hawaii Statehood stamp
US #4415 – Duke helped popularize surfing outside of Hawaii. Surfing became an Olympic sport in 2016.

Also, while living in California, Duke helped save eight fishermen from drowning in 1925.  Their boat had capsized in heavy surf and Duke used his surfboard to quickly ferry the men to shore and return to the ship to rescue more men.  The local police chief said it was “the most superhuman surfboard rescue act the world has ever seen.”  This event also led American lifeguards to start using surfboards in their rescues.

2008 Beijing Olympics Stamp Sheet
Gambia #3158 – Issued for the 2008 Olympics, this sheet includes a stamp honoring Duke.

Duke returned to Hawaii and from 1932 to 1961 served as sheriff of Honolulu.  He was the first person inducted into the Swimming and Surfing Halls of Fame.  Duke has also been inducted into the US Olympic Hall of Fame and the Duke Kahanamoku Invitational Surfing Championships were named in his honor.

2002 37¢ Duke Kahanamoku Classic First Day Cover
US #3660 – Classic First Day Cover

Duke died on January 22, 1968, of a heart attack.  His ashes were scattered into the ocean.

 
Read More - Click Here


 

U.S. #3068q
32¢ Men’s Swimming
1996 Summer Olympics

Issue Date: May 2, 1996
City: Washington, DC and Atlanta, GA
Quantity: 16,207,500
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
The swimming contests of the first modern Olympic games in 1896 were held outdoors in open water. Swimmers not only battled unusually cold weather and frigid water temperatures of 55 degrees Fahrenheit, but also waves that rose as high as 12 feet!­ Alfred Hajos, the gold medal winner of the 1500-meter freestyle that year, who had coated himself with a half-inch thick layer of grease to protect himself from the cold, credited his speedy finish of the race to his “will to live.”
 
Today, individual male athletes compete in 16 different swimming events at the Olympics. Four different strokes are used in these events: the crawl, which is not officially recognized as a stroke, but is used in all freestyle competitions due to its speed; the backstroke, the breaststroke, and the butterfly. Individual freestyle races vary in length from 50 meters to 1500 meters. Men’s backstroke, breaststroke, and butterfly races are 100 meters and 200 meters in length.
 
In addition to these races, swimmers compete in the 200-meter and 400-meter individual medleys, in which equal distances of each stroke are swum. Teams of four swimmers compete in the 400-meter and 800-meter freestyle relay and 800-meter medley relay, in which each member of the team swims a different stroke.
 

Happy Birthday, Duke Kahanamoku

2002 37¢ Duke Kahanamoku stamp
US #3660 was issued on Duke’s 112th birthday.

Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku (also known as “The Duke” and “The Big Kahuna”) was born on August 24, 1890, in Haleʻākala, Honolulu, Kingdom of Hawaii.  Duke was a record-setting Olympic swimmer who helped popularize surfing outside of Hawaii.

Duke’s family was related to the Kamehamehas, who’d led Hawaii for several years – his family was considered lower-ranking nobles.  When he was three, his family moved to Kālia, Waikiki, to be closer to his extended family.  He grew up with five brothers, three sisters, and 31 cousins.  Duke attended school there but didn’t graduate, instead leaving school to help support his family.

1996 32¢ Olympic Games: Men's Swimming stamp
US #3068q – Duke won three gold and two silver medals during his Olympic career.

Duke spent much of his spare time on the beach, surfing and swimming.  Surfing was an ancient Polynesian sport that had declined in most of the Pacific by 1900.  “He’enalu” (wave-sliding) was still practiced in Waikiki where Duke grew up though.  He was a strong swimmer.  In fact, in August 1911, he reportedly set a new 100-yard freestyle world record of 55.4 seconds, 4.6 seconds better than the existing, officially recognized world record.  Duke also broke the 200-yard and 50-yard records, but the Amateur Athletic Union didn’t believe him and didn’t give him credit for these accomplishments for many years.

In spite of this snub, Duke easily qualified for the US Olympic swimming team in 1912, the first of five trips he’d make to the Olympics.  In his first Olympics, in 1912, he almost slept through the 100-meter freestyle.  He persuaded officials to delay the race long enough for him to put a swimsuit on, then went on to break the Olympic record and to win the gold medal.

2002 37¢ Duke Kahanamoku Fleetwood Plate Block First Day Cover
US #3660 – Fleetwood Plate Block First Day Cover

Duke won two more gold medals at Antwerp in the 1920 games.  He and his brother Samuel stood together on the podium in Paris in 1924, where Duke won the silver and Samuel won the bronze in the 100-meter freestyle event.  Duke was also on the US water polo team in the 1932 Olympics but did not participate in a game.

2002 37¢ Duke Kahanamoku Mystic First Day Cover
US #3660 – Mystic First Day Cover

In between his Olympic appearances and after retiring from them, Duke traveled the world for swimming exhibitions.  While on these trips he also put on surfing exhibitions, which helped to popularize the sport.  Previously, it wasn’t well known outside of Hawaii.  Duke brought surfing to California in 1912 and lived there for several years.  During his time in California, Duke worked as a background actor and character actor in several Hollywood films.

2009 44¢ Hawaii Statehood stamp
US #4415 – Duke helped popularize surfing outside of Hawaii. Surfing became an Olympic sport in 2016.

Also, while living in California, Duke helped save eight fishermen from drowning in 1925.  Their boat had capsized in heavy surf and Duke used his surfboard to quickly ferry the men to shore and return to the ship to rescue more men.  The local police chief said it was “the most superhuman surfboard rescue act the world has ever seen.”  This event also led American lifeguards to start using surfboards in their rescues.

2008 Beijing Olympics Stamp Sheet
Gambia #3158 – Issued for the 2008 Olympics, this sheet includes a stamp honoring Duke.

Duke returned to Hawaii and from 1932 to 1961 served as sheriff of Honolulu.  He was the first person inducted into the Swimming and Surfing Halls of Fame.  Duke has also been inducted into the US Olympic Hall of Fame and the Duke Kahanamoku Invitational Surfing Championships were named in his honor.

2002 37¢ Duke Kahanamoku Classic First Day Cover
US #3660 – Classic First Day Cover

Duke died on January 22, 1968, of a heart attack.  His ashes were scattered into the ocean.