#3068s – 1996 32c Olympic Games: Equestrian

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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- MM644215x46mm 15 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
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$7.95
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- MM214338x46mm 15 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
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U.S. #3068s
32¢ Equestrian
1996 Summer Olympics

Issue Date: May 2, 1996
City: Washington, DC and Atlanta, GA
Quantity: 16,207,500
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
A part of Olympic competition since 1912, equestrian events include dressage, jumping, and the three-day events for both teams and individuals. Since 1952, women have competed with men in equestrian events.
 
In dressage, the horse is guided through a specific series of movements. These may include the passage, a rhythmic, elevated trot in which the horse slowly moves forward, or the piaffe, which resembles a trot, but is done without any movement forward, backward, or side to side. Judges give points for proper execution of techniques and penalize errors.
 
Jumping competitions are held on specially designed courses which include high jumps, wide jumps, and two or more jumps close together. Penalties, called faults, are given for knocking down parts of obstacles, or for a refusal – in which the horse refuses to jump an obstacle. After three refusals a horse and rider are disqualified.
 
The three-day event consists of dressage, jumping, and endurance competitions. The endurance contest has four sections: two “road and tracks,” one “steeplechase,” and one “cross-country.” Penalties are given for falls and overtime, and bonuses are given for completing any of the four sections under the set time limit.
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U.S. #3068s
32¢ Equestrian
1996 Summer Olympics

Issue Date: May 2, 1996
City: Washington, DC and Atlanta, GA
Quantity: 16,207,500
Printed By: Stamp Venturers
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
10.1
Color: Multicolored
 
A part of Olympic competition since 1912, equestrian events include dressage, jumping, and the three-day events for both teams and individuals. Since 1952, women have competed with men in equestrian events.
 
In dressage, the horse is guided through a specific series of movements. These may include the passage, a rhythmic, elevated trot in which the horse slowly moves forward, or the piaffe, which resembles a trot, but is done without any movement forward, backward, or side to side. Judges give points for proper execution of techniques and penalize errors.
 
Jumping competitions are held on specially designed courses which include high jumps, wide jumps, and two or more jumps close together. Penalties, called faults, are given for knocking down parts of obstacles, or for a refusal – in which the horse refuses to jump an obstacle. After three refusals a horse and rider are disqualified.
 
The three-day event consists of dressage, jumping, and endurance competitions. The endurance contest has four sections: two “road and tracks,” one “steeplechase,” and one “cross-country.” Penalties are given for falls and overtime, and bonuses are given for completing any of the four sections under the set time limit.